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Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies

Welcome

Nowhere in North America can women enjoy greater range and depth of Torah study than at Yeshiva University's Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies, which offers the country's largest and most diverse undergraduate Jewish studies program for women. Our program is designed to expose students to the beauty of Torah study and the richness of Jewish tradition. We offer valuable training in rigorous thought, exposure to research methods and opportunities for independent work. Students learn across a curriculum that includes courses in Bible, Hebrew language, Jewish history, Jewish philosophy and Judaic law.

Regardless of focus, all students engage with the textual analysis of Jewish works in the Hebrew and Aramaic originals, through hakhanah, chavruta [study partners] and shiurim [lectures]. The structure of the learning and committed faculty result in genuine relationships that personalize, deepen and distinguish each student's education. The Jewish studies faculty are not only accomplished scholars and moral exemplars; they provide guidance on how to live an ethical life.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College for Women is to provide our students with college-level Jewish learning, skills and knowledge in the sub-fields of Bible, Hebrew Language, Jewish History, Jewish Philosophy and Judaic Studies. A broader aim is to provide students with exposure to the ethics and values that emerge from these disciplines.

Program Student Learning Goals:

  1. Students will be able to understand primary Hebrew texts.
  2. Students will be able to analyze significant issues in the fields of Jewish Studies.
  3. Students will be able to understand the different historical contexts of the various fields of Jewish studies.
  4. Students will be able to synthesize information about the ethical teachings and values that emerge from the study of Jewish texts and traditions.

Jewish Studies on Campus

The Jewish Studies department consists of courses in five different disciplines: Bible, Judaic Studies (Halacha and Torah Shebe’al Peh), Jewish History, Jewish Philosophy and Hebrew language. These disciplines are offered in five different levels: elementary, lower intermediate, intermediate, upper intermediate and advanced, with the goal for students to begin in their levels and continue to advance throughout their undergraduate years of learning. Students should emerge with a fundamental understanding of the questions that lie at the core of each discipline.

Please contact us if you have any questions about Jewish Studies or the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College. We look forward to hearing from you.

Our Programs

Bible

Deena Rabinovich - Chair
drabinov@yu.edu

Biblical studies at Yeshiva University's Stern College for Women exposes students to the richness of the books of the Bible, which are at the heart of Jewish tradition. The study of medieval and modern exegesis helps develop basic skills in textual analysis toward self-sufficiency in lifelong study.

Please contact us if you have any questions about biblical studies or the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College. We look forward to hearing from you.

Bible courses (BIBL) are offered at the beginning, elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

  • 1015; 1016 Introduction to the Bible
    3 credits

    Authorship and canonization; Masoretic text; translations of the Bible; survey of medieval exegesis; modern Biblical studies; bibliographical and methodological guidance. For advanced students.
  • 1081; 1082 Introduction to Exegesis
    3 credits

    Principles of biblical interpretation; survey of classical exegetes.
  • 1083; 1084; 1085; 1086 Topics in Biblical Exegesis
    3 credits

    Selected biblical texts, primarily from the Pentateuch, examined in light of classical and modern Jewish commentaries.
  • 1087; 1088; 1089; 1090 Biblical Exegetes I; II; III; IV
    3 credits

    Survey of the major exegetes, classical and modern, analyzing historical background, style, and methodology. First semester: Northern French school; second semester: Spanish school; third semester: Provence and Italy; fourth semester: modern commentators.
  • 1096; 1097, 1098 Nahmanides on Pentateuch
    3 credits

    Analysis of the commentary of Moses Nahmanides (Ramban), his method and terminology, and similarities to—and differences from—other exegetes.
  • 1115-1120 Pentateuch: Weekly Portion
    3 credits

    The weekly portion of the Pentateuch studied with standard commentaries. 
  • 1159; 1160 Women in the Bible
    3 credits
  • 1171, 1172 Personal Development in the Bible I, II
    3 credits
  • 1201; 1202 The Book of Genesis
    3 credits

    Basic introduction to the Pentateuch. Translation and exposition of the text in accordance with standard commentaries, with introduction to Rashi. For elementary students.
  • 1203; 1204 The Book of Genesis
    3 credits

    Same content as 1201; 1202 with selections from Rashi. For lower intermediate students.
  • 1205; 1206 The Book of Genesis
    3 credits

    Same content as 1201; 1202 with selected passages from Rashi and other commentators. For intermediate students.
  • 1207; 1208 The Book of Genesis
    3 credits

    Same as 1205; 1206; for upper intermediate students.
  • 1209; 1210 The Book of Genesis
    3 credits

    Intensive study using classical and modern commentaries. For advanced students.
  • 1211; 1212; 1213; 1214 Topics in Genesis
    3 credits
  • 1303; 1304 The Book of Exodus
    3 credits

    Translation and exposition of the text in accordance with standard commentaries; selected passages from Rashi and other commentators. For lower intermediate students.
  • 1305; 1306 The Book of Exodus
    3 credits

    Same as 1303; 1304; for intermediate students.
  • 1307; 1308 The Book of Exodus
    3 credits

    Same as 1303; 1304; for upper intermediate students.
  • 1309; 1310 The Book of Exodus
    3 credits

    Intensive study using classical and modern commentaries. For advanced students.
  • 1311; 1312; 1313; 1314 Topics in Exodus
    3 credits
  • 1405; 1406 The Book of Leviticus
    3 credits

    For intermediate students.
  • 1407; 1408 The Book of Leviticus
    3 credits

    Same as 1405; 1406; for upper intermediate students.
  • 1409; 1410 The Book of Leviticus
    3 credits

    Intensive study using classical and modern commentaries. For advanced students.
  • 1411; 1412 Topics in Leviticus
    3 credits
  • 1503, 1504 Book of Numbers
    3 credits

    Translation and exposition of the text in accordance with standard commentaries; selected passages from Rashi and other commentators. For lower intermediate students.
  • 1505; 1506 The Book of Numbers
    3 credits

    Translation and exposition of the text in accordance with standard commentaries; selected passages from Rashi and other commentators. For intermediate students.
  • 1507; 1508 The Book of Numbers
    3 credits

    Same as 1505; 1506; for upper intermediate students.
  • 1509; 1510 The Book of Numbers
    3 credits

    Intensive study using classical and modern commentaries. For advanced students.
  • 1511; 1512 Topics in Numbers
    3 credits
  • 1605; 1606 The Book of Deuteronomy
    3 credits

    Translation and exposition of the text in accordance with standard commentaries; selected passages from Rashi and other commentators. For intermediate students.
  • 1607; 1608 The Book of Deuteronomy
    3 credits

    Translation and exposition of the text in accordance with standard commentaries; selected passages from Rashi and other commentators. For upper intermediate students.
  • 1609; 1610 The Book of Deuteronomy
    3 credits

    Intensive study using classical and modern commentaries. For advanced students.
  • 1611; 1612 Topics in Deuteronomy
    3 credits
  • 2049; 2050 The Haftarot
    3 credits

    Those portions of the Prophets used as synagogue lessons. For advanced students.
  • 2107; 2108 Early Prophets
    3 credits

    The Books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. Textual study with classical and modern commentaries.
  • 2109; 2110 Early Prophets
    3 credits

    Selections from the Early Prophets, with classical commentaries. First semester: conquest of Canaan and early Judges; second semester: later Judges and the establishment of the Monarchy. For advanced students.
  • 2114 through 2365 Early Prophets
    3 credits

    Specific portions of the text, with classical and modern commentaries.
  • 2115, 2116 Joshua
    3 credits

    For intermediate students.
  • 2117; 2118 Joshua
    3 credits

    For upper intermediate students.
  • 2119; 2120 Joshua
    3 credits

    For advanced students.
  • 2121 Judges
    3 credits

    For intermediate students.
  • 2122; 2123 Judges
    3 credits

    For upper intermediate students.
  • 2125; 2126 Judges
    3 credits

    For advanced students.
  • 2148; 2149 Samuel
    3 credits

    For intermediate students.
  • 2152; 2153 Samuel I
    3 credits

    For upper intermediate students.
  • 2154; 2155 Samuel II
    3 credits

    For upper intermediate students.
  • 2156; 2157 Samuel I
    3 credits

    For advanced students.
  • 2158; 2159 Samuel II
    3 credits

    For advanced students
  • 2160 Topics in Samuel
    3 credits
  • 2355; 2356 Kings
    3 credits

    For intermediate students.
  • 2357; 2358 Kings I
    3 credits

    For upper intermediate students.
  • 2359; 2360 Kings I
    3 credits

    For advanced students.
  • 2363 Topics in Kings
    3 credits
  • 2500 through 2879 The Later Prophets
    3 credits

    Texts studied with classical and modern commentaries; literary analysis; emphasis on historical background and religious and social problems considered by the Prophets.
  • 2501; 2502 Later Prophets—Survey
    3 credits
  • 2503; 2504 Isaiah
    3 credits
  • 2505; 2506 Topics in Isaiah
    3 credits
  • 2555; 2556 Jeremiah
    3 credits
  • 2605; 2606 Ezekiel
    3 credits
  • 2653 Minor Prophets
    3 credits
  • 2658 Seven Minor Prophets
    3 credits
  • 2805; 2806 Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
    3 credits
  • 3205; 3206 Psalms
    3 credits

    For lower intermediate students.
  • 3207; 3208 Psalms
    3 credits

    For upper intermediate students.
  • 3209; 3210 Psalms
    3 credits

    For advanced students.
  • 3257; 3258 Proverbs
    3 credits
  • 3307; 3308 Job
    3 credits
  • 3403, 3404 Five Megillot
    3 credits

    For intermediate students.
  • 3407; 3408 Five Megillot
    3 credits

    For upper intermediate students.
  • 3409; 3410 Five Megillot
    3 credits

    For advanced students.
  • 3415; 3416 Song of Songs
    3 credits
  • 3450 Ruth
    3 credits
  • 3510 Lamentations
    3 credits
  • 3659; 3660 Ecclesiastes
    3 credits
  • 3707; 3710 Esther
    3 credits

    Intermediate-Advanced levels.
  • 3711; 3712 Selected Megillot
    3 credits
  • 3807 Daniel
    3 credits
  • 3857 Ezra-Nehemiah
    3 credits
  • 3909 Chronicles
    3 credits
  • 4002; 4003 Biblical Narrative
    3 credits

    Narrative forms in prose and historical books; readings in biblical narratives, especially of the Pentateuch, with accompanying medieval and modern commentaries.
  • 4901, 4902 Independent Study
    See Academic Information and Policies section.
  • 4930-4939 Selected Topics in Bible

Major

Jewish studies majors may concentrate in Bible. See the description of the Jewish studies major. Bible courses are offered on the beginning, elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels.

Distribution Requirements

The Jewish Studies requirement at Stern College consists of six semesters of core (three courses for a total of eight or nine lecture hours per week), plus fourteen additional Jewish Studies credits. Core generally consists of one course in Tanakh, one in Jewish Law and Rabbinic Literature (Judaic studies) and a third course selected from among Hebrew Language and Literature, Jewish History or Jewish Philosophy. Please see distribution requirements below:

  • Bible: 15 credit minimum
  • Judaic Studies: 15 credit minimum
  • Jewish History: 5 credit minimum
  • Jewish Philosophy: 5 credit minimum
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101: 5 courses
    • HEBR 1102: 4 courses
    • HEBR 1103-1105: 3 courses
    • HEBR 1106-1108: 2 courses
    • HEBR 1205 or above: 1 course
For Participants in Joint Programs

Participants in Joint Programs including Engineering, Nursing (with John Hopkins), Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Podiatry, and Social Work are required to complete four (4) semesters of CORE and 14 additional J.S. credits with the following distribution:

  • Bible: 12 credits
  • Judaic Studies: 12 credits
  • Jewish History: 3 credits
  • Jewish Philosophy: 2 credits
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101-1102: 4 courses
    • HEBR 1103-1105: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1106-1108: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1205 or above: 1 course 

  • Mordechai Cohen
    Professor of Bible
    Associate Dean, Bernard Revel School of Jewish Studies
  • Meir Goldwicht
  • Joel and Maria Finkle Visiting Israeli Rosh Yeshiva
    Visiting Professor of Jewish History
  • Naomi Grunhaus
    Associate Professor of Bible
  • Ephraim Kanarfogel
    E. Billi Ivry University Professor of Jewish History, Literature and Law
  • Michelle Levine
    Associate Professor of Bible
  • Nechama Price
    Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies and Bible
  • Deena Rabinovich
    Senior Lecturer in Bible
    Director, Legacy Heritage Fund Jewish Educator's Project
    Chair, Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies
  • Smadar Rosensweig
    Clinical Associate Professor of Bible
  • Jacob J. Schacter
    University Professor of Jewish History and Jewish Thought 
    Adjunct Instructor in Jewish Studies
    Senior Scholar, Center for the Jewish Future
  • Shoshana Schechter
    Associate Dean of Torah Studies
    Senior Lecturer in Bible
    Supervisor for Mechina
  • Ian Shaffer
    Adjunct Instructor in Bible

Please note: Links to external sites are offered as a convenience to visitors, as a starting point for exploration. Such sites are neither endorsed nor regulated by Yeshiva University, which accepts no responsibility for their content.

Research

Internships

Graduate Study

Careers

  • Options for Jewish Studies Majors
    Career paths for Jewish Studies majors, from Indiana University.
  • Jewish Studies Majors
    Career opportunities, from Rutgers University.

News and Organizations

Hebrew

Deena Rabinovich - Chair
drabinov@yu.edu

Hebrew language courses at Yeshiva University's Stern College for Women provide students with the basic tools to study primary source material in all disciplines of Jewish studies. Reading comprehension, oral conversation and composition skills, leading to the study of modern Hebrew literature, provide insights into Jewish culture impossible to achieve through translations.

Please contact us if you have any questions about Hebrew language studies or the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College. We look forward to hearing from you.

Students will be assigned to the appropriate Hebrew level based on a Hebrew Placement Exam. Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

Hebrew (HEBR)

  • HEBR 1101/1102 Elementary Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Develop essentials of oral expression and basic reading and writing skills, with a focus on the foundations of grammar and acquisition of frequently used words in daily life.
  • HEBR 1103/1104 Lower Intermediate Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Further development of basic reading comprehension, writing and speaking skills; enhance basic grammatical skills; and expand vocabulary.
  • HEBR 1105, 1106 Intermediate Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Further expansion of vocabulary, oral expression, and reading comprehension and writing skills; reinforce the rules of grammatical structures of Hebrew; use understanding of grammar to analyze Hebrew context.
  • HEBR 1107, 1108 Intermediate Hebrew III, IV
    3 credits

    Review Hebrew’s grammatical structures, with focus on their utilization for reading comprehension, writing and speaking skills. Students will be introduced to unedited Hebrew texts (journalistic and scholastic) to further expand their vocabulary.
  • HEBR 1205, 1206 Upper Intermediate Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Students will be introduced to modern Hebrew literature—poetry and prose—with a focus on the history of Eretz Yisrael since the early 20th century. They will analyze poetry using grammatical knowledge and implicit word meaning and develop the skill of writing a critical paragraph in Hebrew. Speaking skills will also be cultivated.
  • HEBR 1233, 1234 Conversational Hebrew
    1 credit

    Development of fluency in speaking Hebrew. For upper intermediate-advanced level students.
  • HEBR 1321, 1322 Biblical Hebrew
    3 credits

    Review of basic forms; principles of phonology, morphology and syntax.
  • HEBR 1409, 1410 Advanced Hebrew Conversation
    3 credits

    Spoken modern Hebrew, using advanced textbooks and Israeli newspapers.
  • HEBR 2525; 2526 Medieval Hebrew Poetry
    3 credits

    Selected readings in the Hebrew poetry of the Middle Ages, with emphasis on Yehudah Halevi, Shmuel HaNagid, Solomon Ibn Gabirol and Abraham Ibn Ezra.
  • HEBR 2567, 2568 Modern Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    The movement for Enlightenment (Haskalah) and the national renaissance, with readings in the major writers of the period.
  • HEBR 2669 The Hebrew Short Story of the 20th Century
    3 credits

    Detailed examination of the short story genre, its main characteristics, motifs, themes, and techniques as reflected in the works of various 20th-century writers.
  • HEBR 2687 Foundations of Renaissance Literature
    3 credits

    The works of Ahad Ha’am, Bialik, and Mendele.
  • HEBR 2688 20th-Century Literature
    3 credits

    Hebrew prose and poetry of the 20th century; literary analysis of selected readings of the major modern authors.
  • HEBR 2697; 2698 Contemporary Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    Hebrew prose and poetry since 1948; literary analysis of selected readings of the major authors.
  • HEBR 2709 Literature of the Holocaust
    Examination of literary responses of three generations of prominent Hebrew writers to the Shoah in poetry and prose.
  • HEBR 2710; 2719; 2720; 2729; 2730; 2739; 2740 Topics in Modern Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    Each semester examines a specific area, such as Israelis and Jews, center and margins in contemporary Israeli society, literature of the Holocaust, women’s literature, war and peace in contemporary Israeli literature, portrayal of the Arab in Israeli literature, the kibbutz in Israeli literature, Zionism in Hebrew literature.
  • HEBR 2810 Agnon
    3 credits

    Critical study of Agnon’s short stories that recount the hardship of Jewish life in the Diaspora and the struggles to recreate a new Jewish identity in the Land of Israel since the early 20th century.
  • HEBR 2927 Biblical Themes in Modern Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    Examination of the different ways modern Hebrew poets since the beginning of the 20th century relate to their Biblical heritage and how the Bible affects their identity as modern Hebrew poets.

Major

Jewish Studies majors at Stern College may concentrate in Hebrew. Please see major sheet.

Distribution Requirements

The Jewish Studies requirement at Stern College consists of six semesters of core (three courses for a total of eight or nine lecture hours per week), plus fourteen additional Jewish Studies credits. Core generally consists of one course in Tanakh, one in Jewish Law and Rabbinic Literature (Judaic studies) and a third course selected from among Hebrew Language and Literature, Jewish History or Jewish Philosophy. Please see distribution requirements below:

  • Bible: 15 credit minimum
  • Judaic Studies: 15 credit minimum
  • Jewish History: 5 credit minimum
  • Jewish Philosophy: 5 credit minimum
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101: 4 courses 
    • HEBR 1102-1104: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1105-1107: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1108 or above: 1 course 
For Participants in Joint Programs

Participants in Joint Programs including Engineering, Nursing (with John Hopkins), Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Podiatry, and Social Work are required to complete four (4) semesters of CORE and 14 additional J.S. credits with the following distribution:

  • Bible: 12 credits
  • Judaic Studies: 12 credits
  • Jewish History: 3 credits
  • Jewish Philosophy: 2 credits
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101: 4 courses 
    • HEBR 1102-1104: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1105-1107: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1108 or above: 1 course 

Please note: Links to external sites are offered as a convenience to visitors, as a starting point for exploration. Such sites are neither endorsed nor regulated by Yeshiva University, which accepts no responsibility for their content.

Incoming Students: Hebrew Placement Exam (PDF)

Research

  • English-Hebrew Dictionary
    From Milon.
  • The Hebrew Bible
    A portal (maintained by a Christian scholar of the Bible) including dozens of links to text and audio files, Hebrew grammars, linguistic tools, and more.
  • Hebrew Literature
    An overview from the Columbia Encyclopedia.
  • Advanced Modern Hebrew
    A collection of resources from Yale University. Includes television commercials and magazine articles.
  • The Valmadonna Trust Library
    A slideshow from the Sotheby’s exhibit and offering.

Internships

Graduate Study

Careers

News and Organizations

Jewish Education

For information, contact
Dr. Deena Rabinovich
drabinov@yu.edu

Stern College for Women offers a major in Jewish education that prepares undergraduates for teaching Judaic studies in day schools in North America.

Mission Statement

Program Student Learning Goals: Graduates of the Jewish education major

  • Will learn how to create a climate of kedusha that reflects the importance of the study
  • Will learn to be a professional educator, one who reflects on her teaching practice and seeks to grow. Develop a professional demeanor
  • Will gain specific content knowledge in Bible, Jewish History, Prayer, Halakha and Oral Law. Beyond the basic requirements for Judaic studies required of all Stern students, Jewish Education Majors take an additional fifteen credits to add to their subject area knowledge. They will be able to apply their subject area knowledge in creating engaging lessons that address the diverse needs of their students
  • Will learn to plan and implement whole class and small group instruction using theories of curriculum as they specifically apply to Judaic studies.   Learns how to plan lessons and activities appropriate for the discipline with clear objectives and goals. Learns to incorporate technology in a way that enhances the learning. Learn how to create appropriate assessment
  • Will learn how to individualize the learning for each student, while working within the community of the classroom
  • Will apply their content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge to actual classroom experiences through fieldwork observations and student teaching. Seminars help students reflect on the experience and deepen their understanding.

Recognizing the need for talented teachers, the Legacy Heritage Fund partnered with Stern College to create LHSP, a three-year program which offers a major in Jewish studies with a concentration in Jewish education. It includes one-on-one mentoring, professional development, intensive Hebrew language instruction and substantial fieldwork experience.

 A distinctive element of LSHP is the Katz Scholarship. Provided through the generosity of Mordecai D. and Monique C. Katz, the scholarship, valued at $20,000, is half-grant and half-loan. If the Legacy educator commits to teaching two years of Judaic studies in a North American school after completing the program, the loan will be forgiven.  

LEGACY EDUCATORS: A SNAPSHOT

Where they are teaching: Legacy educators teach all grade levels across the United States, from Yeshiva High School for Girls in New York City to Ida Crown Academy of Chicago.

What they are teaching: All the core Jewish subjects (Tanakh, Torah ShBa’al Peh, Jewish History, Halakha, Hebrew language, Tefilah) using flexible classroom structures, project-based learning, and innovative student assessments.

How they are paying it forward: Legacy educators mentor undergraduates during fieldwork and student teaching, helping them with classroom management, curricular design and lesson delivery.

What they are doing for their community: They are overseeing NCSY chapters and summer programs, directing youth departments for shuls, and coordinating OU-JLIC on college campuses.

  • 2312 through 2320 Methods and Materials in Teaching Specific Subjects
    2-3 credits
  • 2314 Teaching Bible
    3 credits
  • 2319 Teaching Jewish Studies
    3 credits

    This class is taken in the spring of the junior year and includes 2 hours fieldwork and 2 ½ hours of seminar/week.
  • 3215 Seminar and Fieldwork
    1 credit

    This class is taken during the spring of the sophomore year and includes fieldwork on five Fridays and one hour of seminar/week.
  • 3216 Seminar and Fieldwork
    1 credit

    This class is taken during the fall of the junior year and includes 30 hours of fieldwork and 1 ¼ hours of seminar/week.
  • 3218 Seminar and Fieldwork
    1 credit

    This class is taken during the fall of the senior year and includes 30 hours of fieldwork and 1 ¼ hours of seminar/week.
  • 3225 Jewish Education Student Teaching
    6 credits

    Full-time student teaching under the supervision of a master teacher and a faculty supervisor. Students plan and implement whole class instruction, and create a portfolio that will document their growth as a teacher.
    Co-requisite: JEDU 3226
  • 3226 Senior Seminar in Jewish Education
    3 credits

    For Jewish Education student teachers. Analysis of the student-teaching experience. Topics include promoting student motivation, classroom management strategies, student diversity, working with parents and school personnel, trends in educational reform, and sources for professional development, including Internet resources. Students create a professional portfolio documenting their development as teachers over the course of the program.
    Co-requisite: JEDU 3225
  • 1010 Introductory Psychology
    3 credits

    One semester survey of topics in experimental methodology, biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, cognition, development, personality, assessment, and abnormal and social psychology.
  • 1210 Educational Psychology
    3 credits 
    (Same as PSYC 3400.)
    Introduction to theories and applications of principles of learning, motivation, and measurement to education. Topics include: Learning-centered and teacher-directed approaches to instruction, theories of intelligence, exceptionality, and accommodating instruction to meet individual learners’ needs, creativity, assessment,, and the uses of technology to facilitate learning are investigated. Prerequisite: PSYC 1010
  • 2201 Classroom Instruction and Management
    3 credits

    An introduction to models and methods of classroom instruction and management for diverse educational settings. Topics include setting up your first classroom, designing lessons and assessments, enhancing critical thinking skills, theories of motivation, and effective communication with parents and administration. Required for Education minors and Jewish education majors. EDUC elective for majors.
  • 2807 Literature of Pedagogy
    3 credits

    An exploration of classic and contemporary educational texts grounded in the experiences of teachers and teaching. Introduces students to core tenets of educational policy, practice and philosophy. Required for Jewish Education Majors. Elective for Early Childhood & Elementary.

The Jewish Education concentration is a track within the Jewish Studies major. Interested students must meet with the Program Director and be accepted into the track.

39 credits above the Jewish Studies requirement: 15 credits of Jewish Studies with at least 9 credits in BIBL and the remaining 6 credits in either JHIS or JPHI or JUDS; EDUC 2301, 2807; JEDU  2319; 3215, 3216,3218, 3225, 3226: Teaching Bible (3 credits-AGS).

The following courses, which may apply toward the General Education Requirements, are also required: EDUC 2201, 2807 and an Education elective; plus PSYC 1010 and 3400 (same as EDUC 1210).

Some of the above courses may be taken in the Azrieli Graduate School (AGS).

Proficiency in Hebrew is required.

Details of the Jewish Education track are available from the Program Director.

A joint bachelor’s-­master’s program in Jewish Education is offered together with Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration. Interested students should consult the Office of the Registrar. Courses in Jewish Education are not part of a program designed for the preparation of teachers in the public schools and are, therefore, not applicable to certification by the New York State Education Department.

Research

Graduate Study

The Mordecai D. and Monique C. Katz Scholarship for Jewish Educators

The Mordecai D. and Monique C. Katz Scholarships for Jewish Educators provide substantial tuition support for students preparing for careers in Jewish education.

Coursework includes methodology courses and student teaching. During the senior year, students take course in the Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration of Yeshiva University and may be enrolled in an accelerated program toward earning an MS degree.

All scholarship recipients complete a major in Jewish studies, and will receive tuition support in the amount of $20,000 per year in the form of grants and forgivable loans, renewable for three years on campus in New York. Loans will be forgiven on a prorated basis, post-graduation, over the first two years in the field.

Katz Scholars will be chosen on a competitive basis. The selection committee will consider high school and post-high school Israel records, letters of recommendation and evidence of interest in and talent for a career in Jewish education.

After completing the regular application for admission to Stern College, applicants should complete the supplemental forms found under “Mordecai D. and Monique C. Katz Scholarship for Jewish Educators Application.” 

Jewish History

Deena Rabinovich - Chair
drabinov@yu.edu

With an emphasis on primary sources, Jewish History at Yeshiva University's Stern College for Women exposes students to the multifaceted character of the Jewish experience from ancient to modern times. Courses include Classical Jewish History, Medieval Jewish Movements, Holocaust, History of Palestine, and Jewish Intellectual History.

Please contact us if you have any questions about Jewish History studies or the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College. We look forward to hearing from you.

Qualified upperclassmen may receive permission to take courses in Jewish history at Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies. Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

Jewish History (JHIS)

  • 1001; 1002 Survey of Jewish History
    3 credits

    Political, social, economic, and cultural currents in the history of the Jews from the Second Commonwealth through modern times. First semester: Second Commonwealth, late Roman period, and Jewry in the orbit of Islam; second semester: the Jews in medieval Christendom; the development of modern Jewish history.
  • 1101 Ancient Jewish History
    3 credits

    History of the Jews to the end of the First Commonwealth, 586 BCE.
  • 1105; 1106 History of the Ancient Near East
    3 credits

    First semester: third millennium BCE to 1300 BCE; second semester: 1300 BCE to 586 BCE.
  • 1201; 1202 Classical Jewish History
    3 credits

    History of the Jews from the Second Commonwealth through the Talmudic period (586 BCE to 500 CE).
  • 1231 The Apocrypha
    3 credits

    Survey of the Apocrypha, with intensive analysis of one or more of those books; historical and literary aspects.
  • 1233 Early Jewish Movements
    3 credits

    Systematic survey of the Sadducees, Essenes, Dead Sea Sect, Sicarii, Zealots, and other movements during the period of the Second Commonwealth; their relationship to biblical, Apocryphal, and rabbinic Judaism as well as other movements, notably Christianity.
  • 1235 The Dead Sea Scrolls
    3 credits

    Archaeological, historical, and literary aspects of the scrolls; their place in the development of the Hebrew language and Jewish thought.
  • 1301; 1302 Medieval Jewish History
    3 credits

    The Jewish people from the Gaonic period (500 CE) to the Expulsion from Spain (1500).
  • 1321 Jews in Medieval Christendom
    3 credits

    Jewish settlement in Italy and Franco-Germany; Rashi and the Tosafists; law and society; the Crusades and the origins of medieval anti-Semitism; Christian Spain— disputations, conversions, and Expulsion; the Jews in the Renaissance.
  • 1323 Origins of European Jewry
    3 credits

    Origins of Ashkenazic and Sephardic Jewry.
  • 1325 Responsa Literature as a Source of Jewish History
    3 credits

    Social and economic life of the Jews in Germany, from the 11th to the 14th centuries, as reflected in Responsa.
  • 1327; 1328 The Tosafists
    3 credits

    The literary and juridical creativity of Ashkenazic scholarship in the 12th and 13th centuries.
  • 1329 History of Halakhah
    3 credits

    Historical development of post Talmudic legal decision making.
  • 1330 History of Minhagim
    3 credits.

    Historical development of post-Talmudic customs and practices.
  • 1332 History of Medieval Biblical Exegesis
    3 credits

    Leading trends and figures in Biblical interpretations during the 12th and 13th centuries.
  • 1335 The Jews of Medieval Spain
    3 credits

    The Jews in Christian and Moslem Spain; the Golden Age; the Expulsion.
  • 1344 Jewish Christian Polemics
    3 credits

    The debates between Christians and Jews in the Middle Ages based on differences in philosophy and biblical exegesis; their role in shaping and reflecting social and legal relationships.
  • 1371; 1372 Jews in the Medieval Moslem World
    3 credits

    Judaism and Islam; the protected minority; Gaonate and Exilarchate; Karaism and false Messianism; Saadiah Gaon and medieval Jewish philosophy; the flowering of Jewish culture in Moslem Spain; the migration to Provence.
  • 1401; 1402 Modern Jewish History I; II
    3 credits

    Rise and flowering of the Eastern European Jewish communities; Hasidism; the Enlightenment; the Emancipation and development of Western European Jewry; American Jewry; new religious currents; modern anti-Semitism and the Holocaust; Zionism and the founding of the State of Israel. First semester: 1600–1900; second semester: 1900–1948.
  • 1403 Destruction of Polish Jewry
    3 credits

    Seminar analyzing the destruction of Polish Jewry during World War II.
  • 1415; 1416 History of Zionism
    3 credits

    Rise and development of modern Jewish nationalism against the backdrop of contemporary Western civilization and the scope of Jewish history; writings of major Zionist ideologues; role of Zionism within the major Diaspora communities; impact of the rise of the Jewish state movement on the world political and diplomatic scene.
  • 1451 The Jews in Eastern Europe I
    3 credits

    History of the Jewish people in Eastern Europe from the Early Settlement to the Third Partition of Poland (1795).
  • 1452 The Jews in Eastern Europe II
    3 credits

    History of the Jewish people in Eastern Europe since 1795.
  • 1471; 1472 Jews in the Modern Arab World
    3 credits

    Communal, economic, and cultural history of the Jews in Moslem lands in modern times. Prerequisite: JHIS 1002.
  • 1485 The Holocaust
    3 credits (same as HIST 2141.)

    Fate of European Jewry between 1933 and 1945. Topics include the rise of the Jewish question in 19th ¬century Europe; World War I and its consequences; causes of the Weimar Republic’s collapse; Nazi seizure of power; Nazi Jewish policies; ghettoization in Nazi Europe; conception and implementation of the Nazi Final Solution; life in the ghettos; the Judenrat; and Jewish resistance. Under the Eli and Diana Zborowski Professorial Chair in Interdisciplinary Holocaust Studies.
  • 1486 Holocaust and Rescue
    3 credits

    The nature of Nazi anti-Semitism; the evolution of the Holocaust to the mass murder of Europe’s Jews; Jewish responses and the various rescue attempts, including non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews.
  • 1501; 1505 History of Palestine
    3 credits (same as HIST 2303)

    History of modern Jewish settlement in Palestine under the Ottoman rule and the British Mandate, until the establishment of the state in 1948. Topics include: encounters and relations of the yishuv with Palestinian Arabs and the ruling powers; the social, economic and ideological factors that shaped the institutions and the national aspirations of the yishuv and of the Palestinian community.
  • 1511; 1512 Modern Israel
    3 credits (same as HIST 2304)

    Survey of Israeli society, culture and politics from 1948 to the present. Topics: Israel and the Palestinian national movement; global political factors that shaped the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the social, cultural, and political  divisions of Israeli society, and the challenges facing Israel in the twenty-first century.
  • 1575; 1576; American Jewish History
    3 credits

    The Jewish community in the United States: its development from earliest times; immigration and settlement; social, economic, and communal development; contribution to American civilization; the modern and contemporary scene. American Jews and the Holocaust, State of Israel, civil rights movement, Russian Jewry, inner-city tensions.
  • 1577 Jewish Religion in America
    2-3 credits
  • 1803 Historiography
    3 credits

    Seminar on the great Jewish historians; their philosophy, method, and works from ancient times to the present.
  • 1811 Messianic Movements in Judaism
    3 credits

    History of various Messianic movements among the Jewish people from the 1st to the 19th centuries.
  • 1829; 1830; 1831; 1832; 1833;1834 Jewish Intellectual History
    3 credits

    Sequence of courses focusing on major themes in the intellectual history of the Jews from the Second Commonwealth to the present; readings almost exclusively from primary sources. JHIS 1829; 1830 covers the classical period; 1831; 1832, medieval period; 1833, early modern period; 1834, modern period.
  • 4901, 4902 Independent Study
    See Academic Information and Policies section.
  • 4930-4939 Topics
    2-3 credits

    Selected topics in Jewish history.

Major

Jewish Studies majors at Stern College may concentrate in Jewish History. Please see major sheet.

Distribution Requirements

The Jewish Studies requirement at Stern College consists of six semesters of core (three courses for a total of eight or nine lecture hours per week), plus fourteen additional Jewish Studies credits. Core generally consists of one course in Tanakh, one in Jewish Law and Rabbinic Literature (Judaic studies) and a third course selected from among Hebrew Language and Literature, Jewish History or Jewish Philosophy. Please see distribution requirements below:

  • Bible: 15 credit minimum
  • Judaic Studies: 15 credit minimum
  • Jewish History: 5 credit minimum&
  • Jewish Philosophy: 5 credit minimum 
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101: 5 courses 
    • HEBR 1102: 4 courses 
    • HEBR 1103-1105: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1106-1108: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1205 or above: 1 course 
For Participants in Joint Programs

Participants in Joint Programs including Engineering, Nursing (with John Hopkins), Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Podiatry, and Social Work are required to complete four (4) semesters of CORE and 14 additional J.S. credits with the following distribution: 

  • Bible: 12 credits
  • Judaic Studies: 12 credits
  • Jewish History: 3 credits
  • Jewish Philosophy: 2 credits
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101-1102: 4 courses
    • HEBR 1103-1105: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1106-1108: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1205 or above: 1 course 

Please note: Links to external sites are offered as a convenience to visitors, as a starting point for exploration. Such sites are neither endorsed nor regulated by Yeshiva University, which accepts no responsibility for their content.

Research

Internships

Graduate Study

Careers

News and Organizations

 

Jewish Philosophy

Deena Rabinovich - Chair
drabinov@yu.edu

Jewish Philosophy at Yeshiva University's Stern College for Women increases students' knowledge of and sensitivity to the central issues of Jewish philosophical thought through the ages. Free will, theodicy, messianic expectation, ethical theories and other issues receive careful analysis. Through the study of primary source material, students receive training in philosophical terminology and the tools of philosophical analysis. Courses include Jewish Ethics, Theory of Evil, Philosophy of Yehuda Halevi, Philosophy of Maimonides and Philosophy of Rav Soloveitchik.

Please contact us if you have any questions about Jewish Philosophy or the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College. We look forward to hearing from you.

Qualified upperclass students may receive permission to take courses in Jewish Philosophy at Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies. Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

Jewish Philosophy (JPHI)

  • JPHI 1131; 1132 Introduction to Jewish Philosophy
    3 credits

    Philosophical foundations of Judaism; readings from classical and contemporary writers; major religious and national issues and philosophical concepts. First semester: basic beliefs; second semester: contemporary issues. For beginning-, elementary-, and intermediate-level Jewish studies students.
  • JPHI 1135, 1136 Survey of Jewish Philosophy
    3 credits

    Survey of Jewish thought on selected present-day religious, moral, and ethical issues; discussion and analysis based on traditional and contemporary writings.
  • JPHI 1203; 1204 Jewish Ethics
    3 credits

    The moral philosophy of Judaism; individual and social problems in light of Jewish ethical norms and values; readings from selected texts, both medieval and modern.
  • JPHI 1214 Theories of Evil
    3 credits

    The problem and definition of evil as understood in Talmudic literature and medieval and modern Jewish philosophy.
  • JPHI 1224 Theories of Prophecy
    3 credits

    Survey of medieval Jewish sources on the nature and scope of prophecy.
  • JPHI 1309 Jewish Eschatology
    3 credits

    Analysis of textual sources—ancient, medieval, and modern—dealing with eschatology in Judaism.
  • JPHI 1441; 1442 History of Jewish Philosophy
    3 credits

    Problems and concerns of the major Jewish thinkers; role of philosophy within Judaism. First semester: through the medieval period; second semester: modern thought.
  • JPHI 1611, 1612 Medieval Jewish Philosophy
    3 credits

    Selected topics and readings from Albo, Bahya, Crescas, Yehudah HaLevi, Maimonides, Saadiah, and relevant background study (Neo-Platonism, Kalam, Aristotelianism).
  • JPHI 1626 Philosophy of Saadiah Gaon
    3 credits

    Analysis of the Hebrew text of the Emunot veDe'ot, emphasizing Saadiah's treatment of philosophical problems; comprehensive study of Saadiah's philosophy from the historical perspective.
  • JPHI 1647; 1648 Philosophy of Yehudah HaLevi
    3 credits

    Analysis of the Hebrew text of the Kuzari, emphasizing HaLevi’s views on the Jewish religion, Jewish history, the people of Israel, and preeminence of the Land of Israel; HaLevi’s philosophy and its relevance to contemporary Jewish life and thought. For intermediate and advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JPHI 1650 Philosophy of Maimonides
    3 credits

    Selections from the philosophical works of Maimonides: Sefer HaMada of Mishneh Torah, the Eight Chapters, the Guide for the Perplexed.
  • JPHI 1651; 1652; 1653; 1654 Philosophy of Maimonides
    3 credits

    More detailed studies of the material covered in JPHI 1650.
  • JPHI 1801, 1802 Jewish Thinkers of the 18th Century
    3 credits
  • JPHI 1803; 1804 Jewish Thinkers of the 19th Century
    3 credits

    Leading exponents of Jewish thought in the 19th century, with emphasis on the works of Moses Mendelssohn, N. H. Wessely, S. D. Luzzatto, and S. R. Hirsch.
  • JPHI 1813; 1814 Modern Jewish Thought
    3 credits

    Introduction to the philosophical works of the great Jewish thinkers of the past two centuries. Selected readings.
  • JPHI 1815; 1816 East European Jewish Thought
    3 credits

    Selections of representative religious thought from the writings of the Tanya, the Gaon of Vilna, R. Hayyim of Volozhin, R. Israel Salanter and the Mussar Movement, the Hazon Ish, Rav Kook.
  • JPHI 1817; 1818 Philosophy of Zionism
    3 credits

    Major idea, approaches and texts during the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • JPHI 1843; 1844 Contemporary Jewish Philosophy
    3 credits

    History and development of major currents in contemporary Jewish thought, including Orthodoxy, Reform, Conservatism, Reconstructionism, and neo-Hasidism.
  • JPHI 1845; 1846 Philosophy of Rav Soloveitchik
    2–3 credits

    Readings in Rabbi J. B. Soloveitchik’s writ¬ings. The lecture supplies background material and contrast in general and Jewish philosophical reflection.
  • JPHI 1853, 1854 Modern Jewish Problems
    3 credits

    Basic legal concepts, attitudes, and opinions relative to contemporary society that emerge from the Talmud, Commentaries, and Responsa literature.
  • JPHI 1903 Belief and Religious Commitment
    3 credits

    Role of philosophy and the liberal arts (particularly literature) within a religious intellec-tual worldview; medieval views of Jewish philosophers (Albo, Bahya, Saadiah); modern criticisms of medieval positions; reworkings of the relation between faith and reason in modern thought (Barth, Kierkegaard, Newman); Jewish critiques and defenses of secular studies in the modern world (Hirsch, Lamm, Lichtenstein, B. B. Liebowitz, Soloveitchik, Wasserman); literature and religious belief (Jewish and non-Jewish texts).
  • JPHI 1905 Philosophy of Prayer
    3 credits

    Analysis of the philosophy of prayer and of the Jewish prayer book.
  • JPHI 1907, 1908 Philosophy of Biblical Laws
    3 credits

    Examination of classical and modern sources for their conception of selected mitzvot relative to the Halakhah, their biblical origins, and their root meanings in Jewish philosophy. For intermediate and advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JPHI 1917; 1918 Topics in Jewish Philosophy
    3 credits

    Selected topics including faith and doubt, dogma, free will, Providence, the Holocaust, State of Israel. Guided research in addition to classroom meetings.
  • JPHI 1921; 1922 Judaism and Culture
    3 credits

    Analysis of the concept of Torah im Derekh Eretz and comparison to other views on the relation of Torah and general culture. Sponsored by Jacques Schwalbe.
  • JPHI 1923 Dogma in Jewish Thought
    3 credits

    Medieval and modern Jewish philosophical views of the concept of dogma.
  • JPHI 1924 Dogma: The 13 Principles
    3 credits

    The articles of faith of Maimonides and other leading medieval Jewish thinkers.
  • JPHI 4901, 4902 Independent Study
    See Academic Information and Policies section.
  • JPHI 4931; 4932 Selected Topics
    3 credits

    Analytical study of special topics, issues, and movements in Jewish philosophy.

Major

Jewish Studies majors at Stern College may concentrate in Jewish Philosophy. Please see major sheet.

Distribution Requirements

The Jewish Studies requirement at Stern College consists of six semesters of core (three courses for a total of eight or nine lecture hours per week), plus fourteen additional Jewish Studies credits. Core generally consists of one course in Tanakh, one in Jewish Law and Rabbinic Literature (Judaic studies) and a third course selected from among Hebrew Language and Literature, Jewish History or Jewish Philosophy. Please see distribution requirements below:

  • Bible: 15 credit minimum
  • Judaic Studies: 15 credit minimum
  • Jewish History: 5 credit minimum
  • Jewish Philosophy: 5 credit minimum
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101: 5 courses 
    • HEBR 1102: 4 courses 
    • HEBR 1103-1105: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1106-1108: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1205 or above: 1 course 
For Participants in Joint Programs

Participants in Joint Programs including Engineering, Nursing (with John Hopkins), Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, Podiatry, and Social Work are required to complete four (4) semesters of CORE and 14 additional J.S. credits with the following distribution: 

  • Bible: 12 credits
  • Judaic Studies: 12 credits
  • Jewish History: 3 credits
  • Jewish Philosophy: 2 credits
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1101-1102: 4 courses
    • HEBR 1103-1105: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1106-1108: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1205 or above: 1 course 

  • David Shatz,
    Ronald P. Stanton University Professor of Philosophy, Ethics, and Religious Thought
    Chair, SCW Department of Philosophy
  • Rabbi Ilan Schimmel
    Adjunct Instructor in Jewish Philosophy

Please note: Links to external sites are offered as a convenience to visitors, as a starting point for exploration. Such sites are neither endorsed nor regulated by Yeshiva University, which accepts no responsibility for their content.

Research

  • Mendel Gottesman Library of Hebraica/Judaica
    YU’s own, and one of the world’s great research collections in Jewish philosophy, Bible, Rabbinics, Jewish history, and the Hebrew language.
  • Yale University Library: Judaica Collection
    Research portal includes Internet resources, Judaica journals online, reference tools, and more.
  • RAMBI: Index of Articles on Jewish Studies
    Updated daily, the index is based on the collections of the Jewish National and University Library, Jerusalem, and includes materials in Hebrew, Latin, and Cyrillic script.
  • Academic Jewish Studies Internet Directory
    Gathers links to databases, library catalogues, research institutes, and more.
  • Jewish Philosophy
    An overview by L.E. Goodman, from the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Includes links to many thinkers, movements, and topics.
  • Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Links to Jewish topics from an online resource “maintained and kept up to date by an expert or group of experts in the field.” Entries typically include ample bibliographies.

Internships

Graduate Study

Careers

News and Organizations

Judaic Studies

Deena Rabinovich - Chair
drabinov@yu.edu

Judaic Studies at Yeshiva University's Stern College for Women exposes students to the content, methods and history of the Jewish legal system. Knowledge of Jewish law is essential for living a full Jewish life and for translating Jewish values into action.

Intensive study of texts from the biblical period through Talmudic literature, medieval codes and commentaries, as well as modern responsa, provides insight into law as a means of social governance, the functions of dissent and the relationship between law and ethics.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College for Women is to provide our students with college-level Jewish learning, skills and knowledge in the sub-fields of Bible, Hebrew Language, Jewish History, Jewish Philosophy and Judaic Studies. A broader aim is to provide students with exposure to the ethics and values that emerge from these disciplines.

Program Student Learning Goals

  1. Students will be able to understand primary Hebrew texts.
  2. Students will be able to analyze significant issues in the fields of Jewish Studies.
  3. Students will be able to understand the different historical contexts of the various fields of Jewish studies.
  4. Students will be able to synthesize information about the ethical teachings and values that emerge from the study of Jewish texts and traditions.

Please contact us if you have any questions about Judaic Studies or the Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies at Stern College. We look forward to hearing from you.

Judaic Studies courses (JUDS) are offered on the elementary, intermediate and advanced levels. Students are placed on the proper level by examination.

Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

  • JUDS 1000 Introduction to Judaism
    3 credits

    One-semester survey of the material covered in Introduction to Judaism.
  • JUDS 1001, 1002 Introduction to Judaism
    3 credits

    Basic Jewish concepts; analysis of the fundamental principles of Jewish legal history and thought.
  • JUDS 1023; 1024 Jewish Legal Values and Concepts
    3 credits
  • JUDS 1200 through 1250 Jewish Liturgy
    3 credits

    History, philosophy, and laws of Jewish prayer.
  • JUDS 1201; 1202
    3 credits

    History, order, and structure of the prayer book. For intermediate students.
  • JUDS 1203; 1204
    3 credits

    Same as 1201; 1202. For advanced students.
  • JUDS 1210
    3 credits

    The weekday service.
  • JUDS 1350 Introduction to the Kabbalah
    3 credits

    Jewish mysticism; history and development of the Kabbalah; readings from the Zohar and related works on such topics as the Sefirot, Torah, the world, evil, and eschatology.
  • JUDS 1371; 1372 Hasidism
    3 credits

    History and major concepts, with readings from and analysis of classical texts such as the Baal Shem Tov, R. Jacob Joseph of Polonnoye, the Maggid, the Tanya, R. Nahman of Bratzlav, and R. Levi Yitzhak of Berdichev.
  • JUDS 1381; 1382; 1383; 1384 Mussar
    3 credits

    The primacy of ethical conduct and the process of shaping the ethical personality in Judaism, as viewed through the prism of the various personalities and schools of the Mussar movement; primary and secondary sources are used. For advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 1400–1499 Jewish Laws and Customs
    Jewish laws, customs, and concepts; their history and development.
  • JUDS 1401, 1402
    3 credits

    Introduction to sources, texts, terms, and basic concepts of Jewish law.
  • JUDS 1410–1420 Women and Jewish Law
    2–3 credits
  • JUDS 1424
    3 credits

    Visiting the sick and mourning.
  • JUDS 1431
    3 credits

    Kashrut—for elementary-level students.
  • JUDS 1433
    3 credits

    Kashrut—for intermediate-level students.
  • JUDS 1435; 1436
    3 credits

    Kashrut—for advanced students.
  • JUDS 1439
    3 credits

    Home and family—for elementary-level students.
  • JUDS 1440
    3 credits

    Home and family—for intermediate-level students.
  • JUDS 1443
    2–3 credits

    Home and family I (Hilkhot Niddah I); Jewish family purity sources—for upper intermediate-advanced students.
  • JUDS 1444
    2–3 credits

    Home and Family II (Hilkhot Niddah II); Jewish family purity sources—for upper intermediate-advanced students.
  • JUDS 1449,1450
    3 credits

    Marriage: issues and laws relating to dating and marriage; divorce—for advanced students.
  • JUDS 1451
    The Sabbath—for elementary-level students.
  • JUDS 1453, 1454
    The Sabbath—for intermediate-level students.
  • JUDS 1455; 1456; 1457; 1458; 1459; 1460
    The Sabbath—for advanced students.
  • JUDS 1461, 1462
    The Festivals—for elementary-level students.
  • 1463, 1464
    The Festivals—for intermediate-level students.
  • JUDS 1465; 1466; 1467; 1468
    The Festivals—for advanced students.
  • JUDS 1470S through 1479S Sephardic Laws and Customs
    Laws and customs of major Sephardic communities as compared to those of Ashkenazic communities.
  • JUDS 1471S
    2-3 credits

    Origins and history of Sephardic minhagim.
  • JUDS 1472S; 1473S
    2-3 credits

    The Sephardic life cycle.
  • JUDS 1474S; 1475S
    2-3 credits

    Sephardic Sabbath and Festival minhagim.
  • JUDS 1483; 1484
    3 credits

    The Jewish life cycle: laws and customs of major ritual observances and ceremonies in Jewish life.
  • JUDS 1485; 1486; 1487; 1488
    3 credits

    Daily life in the home and synagogue: the laws and customs of Tefillin, Kriat Hatorah Betsibbur, Berakhot Rishonot, Berakhot Aharonot.
  • JUDS 1489; 1490; 1491; 1492
    3 credits

    Interpersonal relationships (such as ethics, charity, slander, revenge, usury).
  • JUDS 1493; 1494
    3 credits

    Ideological issues—for intermediate-level students.
  • JUDS 1495; 1496
    3 credits

    Ideological issues—for advanced students.
  • JUDS 1497; 1498
    3 credits

    The Land.
  • JUDS 1499
    3 credits

    The structure of the Seudah.
  • JUDS 1501; 1502; 1503; 1504 Topics in Jewish Ethics
    3 credits

    For advanced students.
  • JUDS 1507; 1508 Topics in Jewish Law
    3 credits
  • JUDS 1510 Development of Jewish Law
    3 credits

    One-semester survey of the material covered in 1511, 1512.
  • JUDS 1511; 1512 Development of Jewish Law
    3 credits

    The halakhic process and the formulation of halakhic literature: from biblical literature through the Mishnah and Talmud; codification and Responsa; survey of post-Talmudic literature.
  • JUDS 1521; 1522 Introduction to Gaonic Literature
    3 credits

    First semester: background of the Gaon and his authority; institutions and movements in the Gaonic period; second semester: extensive reading in Gaonic literature, including She’iltot de R. Ahai, siddurim, Gaonic Responsa. For advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 1531; 1532; 1533; 1534 Readings in Maimonides
    3 credits

    Selections from the legal codes and commentaries of Maimonides; analysis of the legal methodology and philosophy of law emerging from his works. For advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 1561; 1562 Mishnah Berurah
    3 credits

    Selections from the Shulhan Arukh, with Mishnah Berurah commentary.
  • JUDS 1571 through 1576 The Individual in Society
    3 credits

    Contemporary social and political problems such as ecology, poverty, welfare, and self-incrimination; emphasis on Jewish legal sources directly applicable to these issues.
  • JUDS 1577 through 1610 Modern Jewish Problems
    Analysis of halakhic problems that are currently of special interest; modern Responsa literature and its historical background. For advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 1577; 1578; 1579; 1580
    3 credits

    Survey covering several areas.
  • JUDS 1581 Medical Ethics
    3 credits

    Survey.
  • JUDS 1582; 1583 Medical Ethics
    3 credits

    Beginning of life issues; end-of-life issues.
  • JUDS 1584
    3 credits

    Legal problems in the State of Israel.
  • JUDS 1585
    3 credits

    Problems related to marriage and personal status.
  • JUDS 1586
    3 credits

    Impact of technology on laws of the Sabbath and Festivals.
  • JUDS 1587
    3 credits

    The Holocaust—life of the Jews under the Nazis: such problems as the value of human life and human dignity.
  • JUDS 1591 Topics in Jewish Civil Law
    3 credits

    The following topics, among others, as treated in Jewish law: Eichmann defense (i.e., obedience to orders as a basis for exoneration from criminal responsibility); double jeopardy and entrapment in the attempt to control criminals; the obligation to prevent injury to other persons, and its limits.
  • JUDS 1601 Intellect and Emotion
    2-3 credits
  • JUDS 1602 Ethics of Truth
    2–3 credits

    The status of Jerusalem in Christianity, Islam and Judaism; the status of non-observant Jews in Jewish law and tradition; the ethics of truth-telling in Jewish law and tradition.
  • JUDS 1603 Women and Jewish Ritual
    2–3 credits

    Bat Mitzvah, Kaddish, Birkhat haGomel, mechitzah.
  • JUDS 1603 1604 Amalek and Messianism
    2–3 credits

    Halakhah and morality in Modern times; Chrisitanity, Islam and Judaism: history, religion and contemporary significance; contemporary theological significance of the State of Israel; Messianism in Jewish tradition.
  • JUDS 1820 through 1829 Mishnah
    Text with classical and modern commentaries.
  • JUDS 1821 Women in the Mishnah
    2-3 credits
  • JUDS 1839; 1840 Introduction to Talmud
    3 credits

    Introduction to Talmudic text and commentaries. For intermediate and advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 1841; 1842 Introduction to Talmud I; II
    3 credits
  • JUDS 1843; 1844 Intermediate Talmud
    3 credits

    Selected Talmudic texts with medieval and modern commentaries; emphasis on methodology. For advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 1845; 1846; 1847; 1848 Advanced Talmud
    3–5 credits

    Selected Talmudic texts with medieval and modern commentaries; emphasis on methodology; beit midrash method of small-group study supplements lectures. For advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 1851; 1852; 1853; 1854 Selected Rabbinic Literature
    2–3 credits

    Selections from fundamental rabbinic texts of the medieval and early modern periods.
  • JUDS 1861; 1862; 1863; 1864 Modern Rabbinic Personalities
    3 credits

    Leading rabbinic figures during the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • JUDS 1871; 1872; 1873; 1874 Selections from Midrash
    3 credits

    Readings from aggadic literature. For advanced students in Jewish studies.
  • JUDS 4901, 4902 Independent Study
    See Academic Information and Policies section.
  • JUDS 4931; 4932; 4933; 4934 Selected Topics
    3 credits

Major

Jewish Studies majors at Stern College may concentrate in Judaic Studies. Please see major sheet.

Distribution Requirements

The Jewish Studies requirement at Stern College consists of six semesters of core (three courses for a total of eight or nine lecture hours per week), plus fourteen additional Jewish Studies credits. Core generally consists of one course in Tanakh, one in Jewish Law and Rabbinic Literature (Judaic studies) and a third course selected from among Hebrew Language and Literature, Jewish History or Jewish Philosophy. Please see distribution requirements below:

  • Bible: 15 credit minimum
  • Judaic Studies: 15 credit minimum
  • Jewish History: 5 credit minimum
  • Jewish Philosophy: 5 credit minimum 
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1001 or 1011: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1201: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1211 or 1221: 1 course
  • Hebrew if currently enrolled in Spring 2019:
    • HEBR 1102 must take 1103 this fall
    • HEBR 1103 must take 1104 this fall
    • HEBR 1104 and above, no additional courses needed
For Participants in Joint Programs

Students pursuing Combined Programs in Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant and Podiatry who can meet all graduation requirements within 3 years (either one year in Israel and two years on campus, or three years on campus) are exempt from (2) semesters of CORE and must complete the J.S. credit distribution below. Those interested in Nursing and Engineering should meet with an Academic Advisor.

  • Bible: 12 credits
  • Judaic Studies: 12 credits
  • Jewish History: 3 credits
  • Jewish Philosophy: 2 credits
  • Hebrew if assigned to:
    • HEBR 1001 or 1011: 3 courses 
    • HEBR 1201: 2 courses 
    • HEBR 1211 or 1221: 1 course
  • Hebrew if currently enrolled in Spring 2019:
    • HEBR 1102 must take 1103 this fall
    • HEBR 1103 must take 1104 this fall
    • HEBR 1104 and above, no additional courses needed

  • Kenneth Auman
    Adjunct Instructor in Jewish Studies
  • Saul Berman
    Professor of Jewish Studies
  • Aaron Cohen
    Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies
  • Meir Goldwicht
    Joel and Maria Finkle Visiting Israeli Rosh Yeshiva
    Visiting Professor of Jewish History
  • Lawrence Hajioff
    Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies
  • Richard Hidary
    Professor of Jewish Studies
  • Moshe Kahn
  • Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies
  • Ephraim Kanarfogel
    E. Billi Ivry University Professor of Jewish History, Literature and Law
  • David Pahmer
    Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies
  • Elozor Preil
    Adjunct Instructor in Jewish Studies
  • Nechama Price
    Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies and Bible
  • Jacob J. Schacter
    University Professor of Jewish History and Jewish Thought
    Adjunct Instructor in Jewish Studies
    Senior Scholar, Center for the Jewish Future
  • Gideon Shloush
    Instructor in Jewish Studies
  • Mahnaz Shmalo
    Adjunct Instructor in Bible and Jewish Studies
  • Daniel Wolff
    Senior Lecturer in Jewish Studies
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