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Education Program

Stern College for Women offers a major in education that prepares undergraduates for careers in teaching in private schools as well as in public schools in New York State. Early Childhood Education (Birth – Grade 2) and Elementary Education/Childhood (Grades 1-6) are both registered programs with the New York State Education Department.

Yeshiva University is currently pursuing accreditation of its educator preparation programs by the Association for Advancing Quality in Educator Preparation (AAQEP). Pursuant to 52.21 of the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, the educator preparation programs offered by Yeshiva University are considered to be continuously accredited for purposes of meeting the New York State requirement that all such programs maintain continuous accreditation.

Upon completion of the program requirements and teacher certification examinations, students apply for the New York State Initial Teacher Certification.

The Education Department also offers an 18-credit minor designed to provide non-majors with broad exposure to the principal ideas and trends in contemporary educational theory and practice. The course of study is appropriate for students who are interested in secondary education, school psychology, or speech therapy.  

Mission Statement

The mission of the Stern College for Women Department of Education is to prepare young women to become competent, capable, and caring teachers who are reflective, lifelong learners.  The strong pedagogical core is aligned with the New York State Teaching Standards, Danielson Framework for Teaching Clusters, Engage NY Learning Standards, and the Association for Advancing Quality in Educator Preparation (AAQEP) Standards. The comprehensive and diverse course offerings are informed by our commitment to developmentally appropriate best professional practices to improve teaching and learning for all children. Fieldwork experiences and a full professional semester of student teaching in local urban public and non-public schools provide our pre-service students with solid preparation leading to New York State initial certification in early childhood (Birth-Grade 2) or childhood (Grade 1-6) education. Unique to our New York State Certified and AAQEP accredited Educator Preparation Program is a special collaboration with Lincoln Center Education that provides pre-service candidates with a foundation in arts integration. In addition, candidates who complete our program are prepared to teach children from diverse multicultural backgrounds, address differentiated learning needs, 21st century technological skills, and contribute meaningfully to their larger school communities & professional networks.

Program Student Learning Goals

  • Liberal Arts Content Knowledge: Education Majors will be able to apply their subject area knowledge to address the complex and diverse intellectual, social, and moral needs of today’s youth in today’s schools, including incorporating appropriate technology to meet a diversity of learning needs and styles.
  • Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Education Majors will be able to articulate and apply theoretical principles of pedagogy in the art and science of teaching, to plan and implement focused, coherent, sequenced whole class and small group standards-based instruction, as well as reflect on their teaching abilities in order to continuously improve those abilities.
  • Exposure to Diverse Learning Contexts and Learners: Clinical Experiences (Fieldwork & Student Teaching): Education Majors will be able to continuously apply their learned pedagogical knowledge and skills in the classroom in a professional, collaborative, and caring manner, and apply their clinical experiences to deepen their learning of pedagogical knowledge in their course work.
  • Experiential Learning: Education Majors will participate in a constructivist-based approach to teaching and learning that emphasizes the active role of the individual, collaboration, and guidance from experts within learning communities, as well as the use of arts and technology to enhance and promote learning.

For information contact: Dr. Miriam Hirsch mhirsch2@yu.edu

Program Information

Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

Education (EDUC)

  • 1210 Educational Psychology 3 credits (Same as PSYC 3400.)
    Introduction to theories and applications of principles of learning, motivation, and measurement to education. Topics include: Learning-centered and teacher-directed approaches to instruction, theories of intelligence, exceptionality, and accommodating instruction to meet individual learners’ needs, creativity, assessment,, and the uses of technology to facilitate learning are investigated. This course may be taken through Yeshiva University's Azrieli Graduate School as JED 5010.
    Prerequisite: PSYC 1107
  • 2130 Foundations of Early Childhood Education 3 credits
    Introduction to early childhood education (birth-grade 2). Study of physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and aesthetic development in young children. Developmentally appropriate practices, classroom management and guidance, parent involvement, assessment, and reporting. Approaches to learning, including behaviorist, maturationist, constructivist, brain-based learning, and the Project Approach. Adapting instruction for learners with diverse needs. Case studies, problem solving, role playing, team research, and hands-on activities are among the learning strategies incorporated into this interactive course. The course includes 25 hours of field work over the course of the semester any morning Monday through Friday. The student will be placed by the instructor in an appropriate classroom that meets the fieldwork requirements for the course.
  • 2133 Linguistic Tools and Literacy Development in Young Children 3 credits
    This course explores development of language acquisition, creative expression, and literacy skills in young children. Students identify approaches to second language acquisition in the Hebrew classroom. Discussions focus on the examination of developmentally appropriate characteristics and behaviors of children from birth through second grade. The course addresses differentiated and standard based instruction, formative and summative assessment of growth, and the influence of parents and community on linguistic development. This course includes 25 hours of field work over the course of the semester any morning Monday through Friday. Each student will be placed by the instructor in an appropriate classroom that meets the fieldwork requirements for the course.
  • 2134 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood II 2 credits
    Exploration of theoretical models and empirical studies related to the sequential development of language acquisition and literacy. Instructional strategies and classroom environments facilitating success in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The role of literature in the development of literacy. Formal and informal assessments of learning. Instructional issues and methods for teaching English language learners. Exposure to methods of reading/writing differentiated instruction addressing enrichment and special populations. Students perform 25 hours of fieldwork in a public school classrooms (grades k–2) incorporating NYS English Language Arts Standards and Balanced Developmental reading instruction. Each student will be placed by the instructor in an appropriate classroom that meets the fieldwork requirements for the course.
  • 2138 The Integrated Curriculum: Mathematics and Science in Early Childhood Education 3 credits
    This course examines principles in the development and integration of mathematics and science in the early childhood classroom. Students will explore methods of learning and teaching in a classroom of diverse learners. Through discussion, workshops, small group work, and use of manipulatives, technology and various scientific activities, students explore number operation, patterns, geometry, and measurement. Observing, classifying, and comparing are used to demonstrate the scientific process. This course includes 25 hours of field work over the course of the semester any morning Monday through Friday. Each student will be placed by the instructor in an appropriate classroom that meets the fieldwork requirements for the course.
    Prerequisites: EDUC 2130.
  • 2201 Classroom Instruction and Management 3 credits
    An introduction to research based effective strategies for classroom instruction and management. Topics include setting up your first classroom, designing lessons and assessments, enhancing critical thinking skills, theories of motivation, and effective communication with parents and administration. Required for Education minors and Jewish education concentrators. EDUC elective for majors.
  • 2300 Introduction to Elementary (Childhood) Education 3 credits
    Survey of learning, teaching, and schooling for children (grades 1–6) from historical, philosophical, sociological, cultural, and political perspectives. Analysis of conceptions of teachers, schools, and learning based on students’ own experiences as learners and as represented in educational scholarship. Includes 36 hours of classroom observation. Required of all prospective elementary education majors.
  • 2301 Language and Literacy in Elementary (Childhood) Education I 3 credits
    Exploration of theoretical models and empirical studies related to the sequential development of language acquisition and literacy. Instructional strategies and classroom environments facilitating success in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The role of literature in the development of literacy. Formal and informal assessments of learning. Instructional issues and methods for teaching English language learners. Exposure to methods of reading/writing remediation and enrichment for special populations. Students perform 24 hours of fieldwork in classrooms (grades 1–6) incorporating NYS English Language Arts Standards and Balanced Literacy components.
    Prerequisite: EDUC 2300 or permission of the instructor.
  • 2302 Language and Literacy in Elementary (Childhood) Education II 3 credits
    Continuation of Language and Literacy in Elementary (Childhood) Education I. Study and analysis of the linguistic and educational contexts of literacy. Instructional strategies, components, and classroom environments that facilitate success within the language arts (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in grades 1–6. The use of fiction and nonfiction trade books and the design of integrated curricula. Teaching literacy to English language learners and special populations for remediation and enrichment. Formal and informal assessments. Internet applications as a resource in literacy instruction. Students perform 12 hours of supervised fieldwork in elementary school settings.
  • 2303 Teaching Social Studies 3 credits
    Concepts, methods, and strategies for teaching social studies according to NYS Learning Standards at the early childhood and elementary level. Approaches to thematic and interdisciplinary curriculum planning, including inquiry methods for studying history, economics, civics, geography, global education, and current events -with diverse student populations. Digital and media literacy and arts based learning experiences included.
  • 2304 Mathematics Methods and Curriculum for Elementary Teachers 3 credits
    Strategies for mathematics instruction and classroom activities with diverse student groups. Exploration of current issues and trends in mathematics education, including the role of technology. Students perform 12 hours of supervised fieldwork in elementary school settings.
    Prerequisite: MATH 1010.
  • 2307 Teaching Science in Elementary Schools 3 credits
    Basic concepts in contemporary science curricula. Examination of NYS Learning Standards in Science for grades 1-6. Instructional techniques, materials, hands-on activities, technological applications, and curriculum design for diverse student populations.
  • 2807 Literature of Pedagogy 3 credits
    An exploration of classic and contemporary educational texts grounded in the experiences of teachers and teaching. Introduces students to core tenets of educational policy, practice and philosophy. Required for Jewish Education Majors. Elective for Early Childhood & Elementary.
  • 2890 The Arts in Education 3 credits
    A survey of concepts, skills, and methods for infusing classrooms with arts-based learning. Analysis of the role of the arts in human experience and in promoting creative thinking. Students participate in music, dance, theater, and visual art activities and learn how to design, instruct, and assess arts-based learning. Sessions with Lincoln Center Institute and/or Yeshiva University Museum included. Required for Early Childhood. Elective for Elementary.
  • 2895 Introduction to Museum Education 3 credits
    An elective course for the Education major designed to introduce students to the field of museum education, Held at the YU museum, the seminar exposes students to the role of the museum educator, experiential learning practices, and instructional design in alternative contexts.
  • 2930 Senior Seminar in Elementary Education 3 credits
    The senior seminar course is the companion course to the full time elementary education student teaching practicum EDUC 2940. Students will have the opportunity to reflect, discuss, analyze and evaluate their immersive student teaching experiences across two placements. Students will receive direction on preparing for certification exams including ALST and edTPA, career guidance, and professional feedback from supervisors.
    Corequisite: EDUC 2940.
  • 2935 Senior Seminar in Early Childhood Education 3 credits
    The senior seminar course is the companion course to the full time early childhood education student teacher practicum EDUC 2945 Students will have the opportunity to reflect discuss analyze and evaluate their immersive student teaching experiences across two placements. Students will receive direction on preparing for certification exams including ALST and edTPA, career guidance and professional feedback from cooperating teachers and supervisors.
    Corequisite: EDUC 2945.
  • 2940 Elementary/Childhood Student Teaching 6 credits
    Fulltime student teaching (400+ hours) under the supervision of a certified teacher and a faculty supervisor. Students plan, implement and assess whole class instruction, in two student teaching placements (grades 1-3 and grades 4-6).
    Corequisite: EDUC 2930.
  • 2945 Early Childhood Student Teaching 6 credits
    Full time student teaching (400+ hours) under the supervision of a certified teacher and a faculty supervisor. Students plan, implement and assess whole class instruction, in two student teaching placements (grades Pre K-K and grades 1-2).
    Corequisite: EDUC 2935.
  • 3035 Educational Leadership and Supervision 3 credits
    Introduces students to fundamental concepts and theories of educational leadership and supervision. Topics include models of leadership, characteristics of educational organizations, women and leadership, decision making, change theory, community building, and communication practices.
  • 3045 Play: Life and Learning 3 credits
    Explores the power of play and its impact on social, emotional and cognitive development across the lifespan. Through the review of current research, observations and participation in play, students will study essential elements of play in life and in learning.
  • 4003 Education of Exceptional Children 3 credits
    Introduction to the education of children with developmental and learning needs: course provides a survey of prevailing and preferred educational practices for children significantly handicapped by physical, sensory, neurological, intellectual, and affective problems, as well as perspectives on students with cultural, linguistic and economic diversity. Issues related to the various aspects of the delivery of services for children with disabilities, identification of student needs, use of appropriate teaching strategies as well as social and cultural construction of disability will be examined. Students will become familiar with the characteristics and learning styles of students with a broad range of backgrounds and needs. Students will gain professional knowledge and understanding of the five competency areas of the NYS EAS (Education for All Students) certification exam. Two field observations required to a special education class or facility. Required for Early Childhood and Elementary. Prerequisite: Either PSYC 1010, a minimum of 6 credits in EDUC, or permission of the instructor.
  • 4061 Special Education Methods: Applied Behavioral Analysis 3 credits
    A comprehensive and critical presentation of the theory, research, and methodology of Applied Behavior Analysis, with emphasis on improving learning, attention, and social behavior of children with special needs. Field observation in a special education facility.
  • 4901, 4902 Independent Study
    See Academic Information and Policies section.
  • 4930, 4931 Selected topics in Education 3 credits
  • 4935, 4936 Topics in Special Education 3 credits

Education Major

Students may choose from two tracks: Elementary (Childhood) Education (grades 1–6) and Early Childhood (birth-grade 2). Each track leads to Initial Teacher Certification in New York State. Majors must successfully complete the following NYSTCE (New York State Teacher Certification Examinations) exams at the level specified by NY State to apply for initial NYS certification:

  1. Content Specialty Test (CST), EC or Childhood depending on major. EC majors take Multi-Subject for EC (Birth-Grade-2); EE majors take Multi-Subject for Childhood (Grade 1-Grade 6)
  2. Educating all Students Test (EAS)
  3. edTPA - EC majors take Early Childhood edTPA; EE majors take Elementary Education edTPA. These exams are typically taken during the senior year.

Majors are required to take four training workshops: Identification and Reporting of Child Abuse; School Safety and Violence Prevention; DASA; Autism. These will be offered at SCW, Azriel, or available online during the course of the program.

During spring semester of the sophomore year, students apply for formal admission to the teacher education programs. Prospective education majors must demonstrate the intellectual, communication, and interpersonal skills necessary for success as a teacher. The following specific requirements are required for admission to either the Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education Program:

  1. Successful completion of PSYC 1010 with a minimum grade of C+ and EDUC 2130, Foundations of Early Childhood Education; or EDUC 2300, Introduction to Elementary (Childhood) Education, with a minimum grade of B-.
  2. Submission of an essay stating personal aims and aspirations as a teacher.
  3. Recommendation of instructor of either Foundations of Early Childhood Education or Introduction to Elementary (Childhood) Education.
  4. Successful interview with a member of the education faculty other than the instructors of the courses in #3 above.
  5. Successful completion of ENGL 1100, Composition and Rhetoric.

Specific course sequences and permissible electives are to be decided in consultation with an adviser. Students majoring or contemplating majoring in EDUC must meet with an adviser prior to the registration period.

Elementary (Childhood) Education Program: Successful completion of PSYC 1010, PSYC 1100 or 1107, EDUC 2300 and admission to the Education Program are prerequisites for the following courses: EDUC 1210, 2301, 2302, 2303, 2304,  2307, 2930, 2940,  4003, and an EDUC elective, MATH 1010. Elementary majors are required to complete an additional 16 hours of fieldwork as approved by the department.

Early Childhood Education Program: Successful completion of PSYC 1010, PSYC 1100 or 1107, EDUC 2130 and admission to the Education Program are prerequisites for the following courses: EDUC 1210, 2133, 2134, 2138, 2303, 2890, 2935, 2945, 4003, and an EDUC elective, MATH 1010.

Education Minor

EDUC 2300 or 2807 or 2130; 1210 or 1100 or 1107; 2201; 9 credits of Education electives.

For more details about the Education major and minor - see the factsheet at the Academic Advisement webpage.

The following list includes faculty who teach at the Beren (B) and/or Wilf (W)

  • Donna Greenberg
    Adjunct Instructor in Education
    Fieldwork Coordinator and Student Teaching Supervisor
  • Miriam Hirsch
    Associate Professor of Education 
    Chair, Department of Education at Stern College for Women
  • Emily Witty
    Clinical Assistant Professor of Education
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