Summer with YU

Spend your summer with Yeshiva University!

High school students can choose from a wide selection of online summer programs at Yeshiva University: Learn Torah with us. Expand your skillset with interactive bootcamps. And students entering grade 12 and recent graduates can enroll in our academic summer courses. 

Torah Studies

Interactive Bootcamps

Academic Courses


TORAH STUDIES

Continue your Torah learning with Yeshiva University's virtual Beit Midrash: live online courses taught by our esteemed Roshei Yeshiva, Rebbeim and faculty. 

For students entering grades 10–12, recent high school graduates, and current college students.

Torah Studies courses are offered in the following online formats:  

  • Asynchronous: classes have a set start and end date as well as deadlines along the way to keep you on track, but you do not have to be online at a specific time.
  • Synchronous: classes have a schedule of regular live meetings that take place online.
  • Semi-synchronous: classes have a schedule of regular live (synchronous) meetings that take place online, as well as asynchronous course content that you complete by certain deadlines. 

Specific formats are noted under each course, below. 

Please note: Students entering 10th or 11th grade may enroll in no more than three (3) credits. If you would like to audit an additional course, please contact summer@yu.edu for more information. See additional registration policies

Men's Program

Women's Program

Apply Now

Male Torah student

Men's Torah Programs

July 6 - August 7

Learn up to three sedarim a day with our prestigious Roshei Yeshiva, Rebbeim, and Faculty. Become a part of a community, build relationships with mentors, and connect with friends and peers.  

Class times subject to change. 

Morning Seder Offerings

JUD 1228 Laws of Synagogue and Torah Scrolls with Rabbi Aryeh Lebowitz (2 credits) 
Although we may not be able to be present in our shuls, we can learn the about the halachot related to how to conduct ourselves in our shuls and laws concerning sifrei Torah. Be paired with a chavrusa, learn the gemara and rishonim in a dynamic virtual beis midrash, and grow and explore the sugya further with a warm and dynamic group and Rebbe.  
Format: Synchronous Online  
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 9:30am-12pm  
*Open to men only. 

TAL 3008 Talmud Pesachim with Rabbi Etan Schnall (2 credits) 
In depth study of the gemarah and commentaries. Improve your reading skills and analytic abilities through Sugyot of practical Halacha, under a caring and engaging Rebbe.  
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10am-12pm 
*Open to men only. 

TAL 3001 Talmud Berachot with Rabbi Aharon Ciment (2 credits) 
Learn about tefillah from the sources and gain practical tips on how to connect with Hashem through prayer. Study from an engaging and caring Rebbe. 
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10am-12pm 
*Open to men only. 

TAL 3055 Talmud Menachot - Hilchot Tefillin with Rabbi Tanchum Cohen (2 credits) 
Learn everything you wanted to know about Tefillin from the gemarah through modern day poskim. Gain a greater appreciation of this daily mitzvah. Live demonstrations.  
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10am-12pm 
*Open to men only. 

TAL 3055 Talmud Menachot - Hilchot Tzitzit with Rabbi Yehuda Willig (2 credits) 
Learn everything you wanted to know about Tzitzit from the gemarah through modern day poskim. Gain a greater appreciation of this daily mitzvah. Live demonstrations.  
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10am-12pm 
*Open to men only. 

Afternoon Seder Offerings

JUD 1429 Laws of Mezuzah with Rabbi Tanchum Cohen (2 credits) 
In-depth learning coupled with hands-on learning and demonstrations of the laws of mezuza. Bring the class into your home and ask the class about any questions you ever wondered about this mitzvah that we encounter at each of our doorways.  
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 1:00-2:30pm 
*Open to men only. 

JHIS 1807 History of Jerusalem with Professor Jill Katz (2 credits) 
This course surveys the religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia from Canaanites and King David to the modern state of Israel with highlights of everything in between: Judahite, Babylonian, Persian, Hellenistic, Hasmonean, Herodian, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic, Crusader, Ayyubid, Mamluk, Ottoman, and British. Special emphasis will be on the transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary, historical, and archaeological evidence.
Format: Semi-Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Tuesday and Thursday, 1:00-3:00pm (otherwise asynchronous online) 
*Open to men and women. 

Night Seder Offerings 

Talmud Bekiyus [guided study] and Weekly Sichot Mussar (Monday-Thursday, 8-10pm). For more information and to register for Night seder, contact Rabbi Yaakov Taubes.

Tuition

$564 per credit, plus summer fees (click here for tuition details)

Apply Now!

 

 

 

Two femaile students studying Torah

Women's Torah Programs

July 6 - August 7

Select from a wide range of course offerings in areas of Halacha, Tanakh, Jewish Philosophy, and Jewish History. Build relationships and connections with teachers and peers and engage in personal and religious growth and self-actualization. Courses are offered in the morning, afternoon, and evening.

Class times subject to change. 

Morning Course Offerings

BIBL 3711 Five Megillot with Rabbanit Shani Taragin (2 credits) 
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10am-11am 
*Open to women only. 

BIBL 4932 Villains in Tanakh with Professor Nechama Price (2 credits) 
This course will examine the stories and personalities of the Torah’s greatest villains: Kayin, Lot, Hagar/Yishmael, Esav, Lavan, Bilaam, Datan and Aviram, Orpa, and Vashti. Are these figures really as evil as we have been led to believe or do their stories contain nuance and complexity? We will compare the pshat reading of text of the Torah t to that of Chazal and the Mefarshim to uncover new layers of understanding their stories.
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10am-12pm 
*Open to women only. 

JUDS 1843 Talmud Kiddushin with Rabbinat Shani Taragin (2 credits)
Format: Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10am-12:30pm 
*Open to women only.

Afternoon Course Offerings

BIBL 1211 Topics in Bereishit: The Stories You Never Learned with Dr. Deena Rabinovich (2 credits) 
This course will examine the stories of Noach and his sons, Lot and his daughters, Shechem and Dinah, Yehuda and Tamar, and Yosef and Eshet Potifar. Why are these part of Tanakh, and are seen as essential to Sefer Bereishit? How do these stories lay the foundation for the values and mores of the future Am Yisrael? Focus will be on close reading and intertextuality and how the midrash fills in the gaps in the stories.
Format: Semi-Synchronous Online
Meeting Schedule: Monday, 1-2pm (otherwise asynchronous online) 
*Open to women only. 

JHIS 1807 History of Jerusalem with Professor Jill Katz (2 credits) 
This course surveys the religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia from Canaanites and King David to the modern state of Israel with highlights of everything in between: Judahite, Babylonian, Persian, Hellenistic, Hasmonean, Herodian, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic, Crusader, Ayyubid, Mamluk, Ottoman, and British. Special emphasis will be on the transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary, historical, and archaeological evidence.
Format: Semi-Synchronous Online 
Meeting Schedule: Tuesday and Thursday, 1:00-3:00pm (otherwise asynchronous online) 
*Open to men and women. 

Night Seder Offerings

Nightly programming including chaburas with Madrichot, guest shiurim and trivia nights (M-Th, 8-10pm). For more information and to register for Night seder, contact summer@yu.edu.

Tuition

$564 per credit, plus summer fees (click here for tuition details)

Apply Now!

 

 

 


INTERACTIVE BOOTCAMPS

Expand your skills and develop your know-how in some of our most popular areas of study. Dive into something you love or explore something new.

For students entering grades 10–12 and recent high school graduates. Bootcamps are co-ed. Class times are subject to change.

INDS 2950 Cybercrime: The Darker Side of the Web (1 credit)

Cybersecurity
July 6 – August 7
Monday - Thursday, 1-3pm

Our modern life is an exponentially expanding web of interconnected devices that both enable and threaten human existence. From smartphones, computers, online shopping, social media, mobile banking, medical life-support devices, traffic cameras and smart cities to nuclear power plants and self-driven cars, the scope of what is connected to the internet continues to increase, leaving us vulnerable to cyberattacks from every corner of the globe. In this course, you’ll learn about the security risks, vulnerabilities, and bad actors targeting our social networks, banks, homes, schools, government, and country from the darker side of the internet. This highly interactive class includes daily meetings, technical computer labs, and presentations. We’ll hear from industry experts; we’ll walk through emerging security threats; and we’ll practice the technical skills needed to identify, analyze, prevent and ultimately defeat these cybersecurity threats.  

Technical Requirements: Access to fast internet connection and modern Computer with Webcam, Microphone and Web Browser 

Tuition: $1692 per bootcamp course, plus summer fees (click here for tuition details)

Apply Now!

 

 

 

INDS 2950 Data Analytics Fundamentals (1 credit)

Data Science
July 6 – August 7
Monday - Thursday, 1-3pm

This course will open the door to the world of data science and machine learning. We'll learn how to express our ideas through easy coding tools and the computer programming language, Python. Through hands-on activities and projects, we'll use these tools for web scraping, text and image recognition, news analysis classification, weather predictions, and more!

Technical Requirements: Access to fast internet connection and modern Computer with Webcam, Microphone and Web Browser.

Tuition: $1692 per bootcamp course, plus summer fees (click here for tuition details)

Apply Now!

 

 
 

ACADEMIC COURSES

Jumpstart your college degree with YU summer classes. 

For students entering 12th grade, recent high school graduates, and current college students.

Session I Courses
June 1 - July 2

Session II Courses
July 6 - August 7

Application
Information

Courses are offered in two online formats:

  • Asynchronous: classes have a set start and end date as well as deadlines along the way to keep you on track, but you do not have to be online at a specific time.
  • Semi-synchronous: classes have a schedule of regular live (synchronous) meetings that take place online, as well as asynchronous course content that you complete by certain deadlines.

Academic courses are co-ed unless otherwise noted.

SESSION I: JUNE 1 – JULY 2

Class times are subject to change. 

ENG 1026 Face-to-Face: Modern Identities in Film with Professor Elizabeth Stewart (3 credits)
This course will explore how American and foreign film represents various racial, class, gender, ethnic, and national identities, and how they reproduce and challenge those representations at the same time. A second, related, focus will be the role affect plays in our experiences of film.
Format: Asynchronous online

JST 2430 Responses to COVID-19 in Jewish Ritual and Theology with Rabbi Shlomo Zuckier (3 credits)
The novel Coronavirus that emerged in late 2019 has had massive global fallout, with a rising death toll and entire regions shutting themselves down. Jewish communities in America, Israel, and worldwide have been hard-hit by the pandemic, as well. This course examines a variety of responses offered by the Jewish community to COVID-19 in the realms of both ritual and theology, each of which has seen new developments that build upon precedents and develop them in interesting ways. This course will examine a selection of these responses, considering a series of six case studies each in Jewish ritual law (halakhah) and Jewish theology. These case studies will analyze the relevant controversy or diversity of opinion on the issue, focusing on primary sources and zeroing in on the issues and values at stake. It will also offer comparative analyses both with precedents and with parallel developments in other communities responding to COVID-19.
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some live meetings)
Meeting Schedule: Monday and Wednesday, 4-6pm

IDS 1001 Business Algebra with Professor Manachanallur Ravi (3 credits)
This course provides a review of computational and problem-solving skills. Included is a presentation of a broad scope of fundamental mathematical concepts in applied mathematics relevant to accounting, finance, management, and marketing, with examples drawn from different business disciplines.
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings)
Meeting Schedule: Wednesday, 1-2:15pm

MUS 1018 Aesthetic Revolutions with Professor Daniel Beliavsky (3 credits)
This course covers the period of European history framed by Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde and Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring. An era of significant revolutions in music, society, and the arts, it is one that created modernism. By exploring this era's remarkable music, students will develop active and critical listening skills, and begin perceiving the events and internal relationships that govern this repertoire.
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings)
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 1-3pm

POLI 1301 Intro to International Relations with Professor Jonathan Cristol (3 credits) 
Is war between the US and China inevitable? Could the spread of nuclear weapons to countries such as Iran and North Korea make the world less dangerous? Does a separate peace hold between democracies? Is it possible for states to behave morally? This course, which introduces students to the major paradigms, theories, concepts and debates associated with the academic study of international politics/international relations (IR), addresses these and other critical questions. 
Format: Semi-synchronous
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 9-11am

​​​​SCI 1012 Scientific Literacy with Professor James Camara (3 credits)
Science is the principle means by which we come to understand our environment, the planet and the universe. Science also has the ability not only to affect our day-to-day lives, but also to shape our future as individuals and as societies. The responsible citizen must be able to educate himself/herself about scientific matters that have the potential to impact civilization. This course aims to (1) expose you to current issues in modern science that have potential to impact daily life and (2) to give you the skills necessary to educate yourself and engage in discourse about scientific developments in the modern age. We will explore a variety of scientific topics through various modern media including primary scientific literature, popular science columns, documentary films, podcasts, blogs and social media. We will learn how to critically analyze information in each of these media and how to analyze issues related to the application of scientific breakthroughs to our daily life. Finally, we learn about the government agencies that adjudicate and regulate how science interacts with society in our daily lives.
Format: Semi-Synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings) 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 9-11am

SCIE 1050 Science Fundamentals with Professor Lora Danley (3 credits)
This survey course for non-science majors will examine science as it relates to the world around us in our everyday lives. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic scientific concepts in physics, chemistry, and biology and will have a solid understanding of the ways in which science is integrated into the world around them. 
Format: Semi-Synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings) 
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 10-11am

SESSION II: JULY 6 – AUGUST 7

Class times are subject to change. 

ACC 1001 Accounting Principles I with Professor Constance Crawford (3 credits)
Introduction to financial accounting: the accounting cycle, preparation of financial statements, accounting for cash and temporary investments, receivables, inventories, and long-lived assets.
Format: Asynchronous online 
(NOTE: Pre-requisite: Business Algebra)

ARTS 3009 Intro to Computer Design with Professor ST Schwartz (3 credits)
Students acquire a basic proficiency in the software programs essential to graphic design and visual communication: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign.
Format: Asynchronous online

CHEM 1010C Essentials of Chemistry with Professor Lora Danley (4 credits)
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings)
Meeting Schedule:
- Lecture: Monday-Thursday, 1-3pm and Friday, 12-2pm
- Labs: Monday-Wednesday, 3:30-5:10pm

ECO 1010 Principles of Economics with Professor Robert Utzinger (3 credits)
The fundamentals of economic analysis with applications. Microeconomic supply and demand analysis; macroeconomics topics including money, finance, and long-term growth.
Format: Asynchronous online

ENG 1023 Authorship: Plato to Wikipedia with Professor Lauren Fitzgerald (3 credits)
This course explores how writers write—that is, authorship. From a historical perspective, we’ll consider where authors get their ideas, because descriptions of this process have changed significantly over the centuries: Is it divine inspiration? Imitation of the world around us? An expression of who we are? Collaborations with others? We’ll also address who gets to be called an author: For instance, why is there a debate about whether Shakespeare authored his works? Are women writers part of the authorial tradition? What about college students? Most important, we’ll look at why this topic matters to you, right now.
Format: Asynchronous online

ENGR 2001C Foundations of Engineering with Professors Edward Berliner (Lecture) and David Siegel (Lab) (3 credits)
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings)
Meeting Schedule: 
- Lecture: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 9-11am
- Lab: Tuesday and Friday, 9-11am

HIS 4931 How Pandemics Shape the World with Professor Jeremy Brown (3 credits)
The goals of this course are to provide an understanding of epidemics from three different angles: the medical, the social and the religious. We will explore the Black Death, smallpox, cholera, influenza, HIV and the current COVID pandemic, using eyewitness accounts, historic and contemporary scientific papers, literary depictions, and public health perspectives. We will also compare Jewish accounts of the plagues and their reactions with those of other religious traditions.
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some live meetings)
Meeting Schedule: Thursday, 7-8:30pm

JHI 1340 Jews in Medieval Spain with Professor Ronnie Perelis (3 credits)
This course will investigate the cultural history of Spanish Jews (the Sephardim), from the Muslim conquest of the Iberian Peninsula in 711 until the Expulsion of 1492. With convivencia as our lens, we will examine the possibilities and limitations of multi-cultural tolerance by studying the socio-political and cultural trajectory of the Sephardim and their Christian and Muslim neighbors.
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings)
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 1-3pm

JPH 1134 Intro to Jewish Philosophy with Professor Daniel Rynhold (3 credits)
This course enables students to understand and engage with some of the classic works from the history of Jewish philosophy. After an introductory discussion of what Jewish philosophy is, we will turn to Jewish philosophy’s medieval “golden age,” in which thinkers, including Judah Halevi and Moses Maimonides, grappled with some of the most challenging metaphysical issues, such as: Did God create the world? Can human freedom be reconciled with divine foreknowledge? Are the Commandments rational? Beginning with the rather inauspicious excommunication of Baruch Spinoza, we will explore how modern Jewish philosophers like Moses Mendelssohn, Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig and Joseph Soloveitchik have been interpreting Judaic questions for current times.
Format: Asynchronous online

JUD 1490 Interpersonal Relationships with Professor Daniel Feldman (3 credits)
This course addresses fundamental questions and overarching themes in Halaka and Human Relations. Through text, rich discussion, and reflection, students learn about the obligations Jewish law places upon the relationships between people. Similarly, the course covers how the Torah regulates our interpersonal behavior through prohibitions, how we understand the prohibition of loshon hara in the contemporary culture, and how we understand and apply the definition of tzedaka.
Format: Semi-synchronous (online course with some scheduled meetings)
Meeting Schedule: Monday-Thursday, 1-3pm; Friday 12-2pm

MAR 1001 Principles of Marketing with Professor Travis Oh (3 credits)
Also offered in Session I. An introduction to the basic concepts of market definition, consumer behavior, and the principal marketing functions: product line development, pricing, distribution, promotion, sales-force management, advertising, research, and planning. Cases and examples are utilized to develop problem-solving abilities and provide students with a glimpse into the Marketing world. 
Format: Asynchronous online
(NOTE: Pre-requisite: Business Algebra)

POLI 2330 The Life and Death of Terrorism with Professor Yoav Fromer (3 credits)
How is it possible that an idea such as terrorism, rooted in death and destruction, still remains so potent and attractive around the world at the dawn of the twenty-first century? The course will pursue an array of avenues in order to address this ominous geopolitical threat and the political, legal and moral challenges that it continues to raise.
Format: Asynchronous online

PSY 1010 Introduction to Psychology with Professor Eliezer Schnall (3 credits)
One-semester survey of topics in experimental methodology, biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, cognition, development, personality, assessment, and abnormal and social psychology. This course is a prerequisite for all upper level psychology courses.
Format: Asynchronous online

See additional courses at www.yu.edu/summer/undergrad-courses.


APPLICATION & TUITION INFORMATION

Tuition & Fees

Tuition
  • Tuition for Academic Courses and Torah Studies: $564 per credit plus summer fees
  • Tuition for Summer Bootcamp Courses: $1692 per course plus summer fees
Summer Fees (one-time)
  • Application Fee: $65
  • University Fee: $110
  • Registration Fee: $100

Priority Application Deadlines

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis, space permitting.

  • Torah Studies and Bootcamp Courses: Apply by June 15, 2020
  • Academic Courses - Session I: Apply by May 26, 2020
  • Academic Courses - Session II: Apply by June 30, 2020

Registration Policies

  • High School students entering grades 10 - 11: Can enroll in up to 3 credits of Torah Studies and Bootcamp courses for the summer. Not eligible to enroll in academic courses. 
  • High School students entering grade 12: Can enroll in up to 6 credits per summer session and up to 10 credits maximum for the summer, including Torah Studies, Bootcamp courses, and academic courses. 
  • Recent High School graduates (graduating 2020) and current YU college students: Can enroll in up to 7 credits per summer session and 10 credits maximum for the summer, including Torah Studies, Bootcamp courses, and academic courses. 
  • Visiting college students: Please check with your home institution for relevant policies. 
  • Auditing a course: Students may audit up to 1 course in the summer. Students will be charged the cost of 1 credit to audit a course. Students who wish to audit a course should complete the Visiting Student Application and contact summer@yu.edu for the Request to Audit a Course form.

Apply & Register

  1. Go to https://www.yu.edu/myyu and click on "Apply for Admission."
  2.  Select "First time user account creation” and follow the guidelines to create an application Login ID and PIN, and then select Login. PLEASE NOTE: Your PIN must be 6 numerical characters (only numbers). 
  3. On the drop-down menu, select “Undergraduate Summer Program” and then Continue.
  4. Select Summer 2020 under Admission Term, fill in your name, and select Fill Out Application.
  5. Follow the directions to complete the application. (Please note: there are six short sections; you can complete them in any order.)
  6. Once you’ve completed all sections of the application, select Application is Complete.
  7. You will be asked to accept terms and then proceed to payment. The application fee is $65, payable online by credit or debit card.
  8. Once you’ve submitted your payment, you’ll be directed to a “Thank You” screen that contains important information. Please keep a copy of this information for your records.
  9. Send your current college or high school transcript (official or unofficial) to summer@yu.edu.  

Your application will not be considered complete until we have received your transcript. If your transcript is not received prior to the start of the summer session, we may decline your registration.

High School Student Eligibility

High school students must present a high school transcript and a minimum GPA of 80 (or 2.7 out of 4.0). If your average is below this and you feel that you are a good candidate for YU’s summer programming, please submit a written statement to summer@yu.edu explaining what you hope to get out of the summer program, the supports you have in place to be successful, and any other information that may help us understand your preparedness to succeed. 

High school students should be mindful that a grade in a credit-bearing college course will remain on their permanent academic record and that grade might influence college admissions decisions in the future.