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                                                      Fall 2020 Opening Plan: Please refer to our latest updates here

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Wurzweiler School of Social Work

WHERE PASSION MEETS PURPOSE

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Our Programs

Our programs emphasize academic excellence and challenge our students to achieve greatness. We offer: Master of Social Work (MSW) with optional CASAC or additional certificates, Master’s in Special Education, PhD in Social Work, and professional development opportunities.

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Our Programs

Our programs emphasize academic excellence and challenge our students to achieve greatness. We offer: Master of Social Work (MSW) with optional CASAC or additional certificates, Master’s in Special Education, PhD in Social Work, and professional development opportunities.

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Flexibility

Our Master of Social Work programs are designed to suit students’ academic and professional needs, offering online and in-person options, as well as a virtual classroom program. View MSW Options at a Glance.

On-Campus | Online | Virtual Classroom | Summer Program

We also offer scholarships, convenient payment options and financial aid for students.

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Small Setting

We take a personalized approach to education. Students of our program benefit from small and nurturing classroom settings, individualized mentoring, and supervised fieldwork opportunities. This allows students to collaborate closely with one another and with faculty members, creating long-lasting bonds for their professional life and beyond.

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Careers

Our graduates have gone on to become distinguished leaders in social work, academia, the Jewish community and beyond. Our various programs offer multiple career opportunities for students in social work, healthcare administration, substance abuse aid, community service, research, health education and more. Current alumni hold jobs at institutions such as Northwestern Memorial Hospital, NorthShore University Health System, East Harbor Healthcare System, public hospitals, LifeLine Ambulance, and in public and private schools.

Health Alert: COVID -19:  We are here to help: refer here for the latest information and resources

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About Us

For over 60 years, Wurzweiler School of Social Work has been a leader in social work education, creating positive change in the world, with a focus on cultural responsiveness, social justice and human transformation. Ranked top among the nation, our graduate programs will help you advance your career, develop new skills and make an impact on society.

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About Us

For over 60 years, Wurzweiler School of Social Work has been a leader in social work education, creating positive change in the world, with a focus on cultural responsiveness, social justice and human transformation. Ranked top among the nation, our graduate programs will help you advance your career, develop new skills and make an impact on society.

Latest News

Social distancing video

Wurzweiler students and professors work remotely to overcome the challenge of social distancing.

Watch the video

Wurzweiler students and professors work remotely to overcome the challenge of social distancing.

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Wurzweiler Combines Social Work and Education in New Master’s Degrees

Read the full article

Wurzweiler Combines Social Work and Education in New Master’s Degrees

Two new master’s degree programs in special education at the Wurzweiler School of Social Work combine a compassionate approach to human welfare with a strong pedagogical foundation for teachers instructing students with varied abilities and special needs.

One program will cover teaching students with disabilities from birth to grade 2; the second, grades 1—6. Graduates will be awarded a Master of Arts and be prepared for their initial certification exam as well as their certification in special education.

Each program will focus on developing the skills to teach children who require specialized support. The curriculum includes courses in childhood development, pedagogical practice, differentiated instruction and inclusive practices.

“These culturally-sensitive programs are rooted in the values of social justice and equity and will provide opportunities for students who are specifically looking to work in Jewish educational settings as well as secular environments,” said Dr. Joan Rosenberg, founding director of the program.

“As with all Wurzweiler programs, students receive extensive support from faculty, academic advisers and student teaching supervisors as well as from their cooperating teachers with whom they work very closely,” she explained.

The programs are open to individuals just entering the field as well as experienced teachers who want to become certified to teach special education.

Dr. Danielle Wozniak, the Dorothy and David I. Schachne Dean of Wurzweiler, is especially excited to offer existing teachers the opportunity to advance their careers in education as well as improve their earning potential.

Dean Wozniak added, “The program’s first cohort is expected to be as diverse and eager to learn as the groups of students they will educate. Wurzweiler students will understand that the process of learning to be a teacher is never finished. Our graduates will become reflective life-long learners.”

To learn more, visit www.yu.edu/wurzweiler/special-education

 

Dean Wozniak Washington Post article

Dean Wozniak featured on The Washington Post

Read more

Dean Wozniak featured on The Washington Post


In this chaotic pandemic, I weave together some type of order by restoring old chairs

By Danielle Wozniak

Oct. 4, 2020 at 9:00 a.m. EDT

Before the pandemic, I often left my office to catch my train from New York City to my home in Connecticut at 5:56 p.m. But now there was no train, and suddenly my days had no off switch, no end of human need. I was on Zoom, Teams, Canvas, emails and telephone for up to 15 hours a day.

Time itself was warping, and I had no control over it, unable to make it right. I kept dreaming about things being broken or out of place, and I could not fix them or put them where they belonged. I needed to find a shut-off valve, to find something I could do, a hobby or diversion, in the little time I had left for myself.

Read full article.

 

 

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Spirituality Near the End of Life PODCAST

Read the full article...

Spirituality Near the End of Life PODCAST

Rabbis, chaplains, and social workers are often called on to provide spiritual care near life’s end. Whether in response to serious illness, advanced cognitive or physical decline in old age, or unexpected, tragic violence, health care professionals and clergy need to respond compassionately and effectively with families facing spiritual, emotional, and existential crises. Clips from Wurzweiler School of Social Work’s “Spirituality Near the End of Life” Conference in July 2019 include leading clergy, chaplains, and social workers offering their knowledge, skills, and wisdom to assist professionals seeking to better integrate spiritual care into their professional and community work.

Listen to podcast.

Introduction:

  • Gary Stein, JD, MSW, professor of social work, director of gerontology and palliative care and chair of the continuing education program
  • Dr. Lynn Levy, associate professor and the assistant director of the rabbinic program for gerontology and palliative care

1:52—Rabbi Shira Stern, Rabbinic Associate at Temple Rodeph Torah

9:31—Rabbi Richard Address, founder and director of Jewish Sacred Aging

14:35—Rabbi Dayle Friedman, director of Growing Older

18:57—Rabbi Rachmiel Rothberger, Jewish Community Liaison for Calvary Hospital

24:38—Rabbi Simcha Weintraub, rabbinic director of the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services

25:30—Rabbi Raphael Goldstein, former executive director of Neshama: Association of Jewish Chaplains

Social distancing video

Wurzweiler students and professors work remotely to overcome the challenge of social distancing.

Watch the video

Wurzweiler students and professors work remotely to overcome the challenge of social distancing.

""

Wurzweiler Combines Social Work and Education in New Master’s Degrees

Read the full article

Wurzweiler Combines Social Work and Education in New Master’s Degrees

Two new master’s degree programs in special education at the Wurzweiler School of Social Work combine a compassionate approach to human welfare with a strong pedagogical foundation for teachers instructing students with varied abilities and special needs.

One program will cover teaching students with disabilities from birth to grade 2; the second, grades 1—6. Graduates will be awarded a Master of Arts and be prepared for their initial certification exam as well as their certification in special education.

Each program will focus on developing the skills to teach children who require specialized support. The curriculum includes courses in childhood development, pedagogical practice, differentiated instruction and inclusive practices.

“These culturally-sensitive programs are rooted in the values of social justice and equity and will provide opportunities for students who are specifically looking to work in Jewish educational settings as well as secular environments,” said Dr. Joan Rosenberg, founding director of the program.

“As with all Wurzweiler programs, students receive extensive support from faculty, academic advisers and student teaching supervisors as well as from their cooperating teachers with whom they work very closely,” she explained.

The programs are open to individuals just entering the field as well as experienced teachers who want to become certified to teach special education.

Dr. Danielle Wozniak, the Dorothy and David I. Schachne Dean of Wurzweiler, is especially excited to offer existing teachers the opportunity to advance their careers in education as well as improve their earning potential.

Dean Wozniak added, “The program’s first cohort is expected to be as diverse and eager to learn as the groups of students they will educate. Wurzweiler students will understand that the process of learning to be a teacher is never finished. Our graduates will become reflective life-long learners.”

To learn more, visit www.yu.edu/wurzweiler/special-education

 

Dean Wozniak Washington Post article

Dean Wozniak featured on The Washington Post

Read more

Dean Wozniak featured on The Washington Post


In this chaotic pandemic, I weave together some type of order by restoring old chairs

By Danielle Wozniak

Oct. 4, 2020 at 9:00 a.m. EDT

Before the pandemic, I often left my office to catch my train from New York City to my home in Connecticut at 5:56 p.m. But now there was no train, and suddenly my days had no off switch, no end of human need. I was on Zoom, Teams, Canvas, emails and telephone for up to 15 hours a day.

Time itself was warping, and I had no control over it, unable to make it right. I kept dreaming about things being broken or out of place, and I could not fix them or put them where they belonged. I needed to find a shut-off valve, to find something I could do, a hobby or diversion, in the little time I had left for myself.

Read full article.

 

 

""

Spirituality Near the End of Life PODCAST

Read the full article...

Spirituality Near the End of Life PODCAST

Rabbis, chaplains, and social workers are often called on to provide spiritual care near life’s end. Whether in response to serious illness, advanced cognitive or physical decline in old age, or unexpected, tragic violence, health care professionals and clergy need to respond compassionately and effectively with families facing spiritual, emotional, and existential crises. Clips from Wurzweiler School of Social Work’s “Spirituality Near the End of Life” Conference in July 2019 include leading clergy, chaplains, and social workers offering their knowledge, skills, and wisdom to assist professionals seeking to better integrate spiritual care into their professional and community work.

Listen to podcast.

Introduction:

  • Gary Stein, JD, MSW, professor of social work, director of gerontology and palliative care and chair of the continuing education program
  • Dr. Lynn Levy, associate professor and the assistant director of the rabbinic program for gerontology and palliative care

1:52—Rabbi Shira Stern, Rabbinic Associate at Temple Rodeph Torah

9:31—Rabbi Richard Address, founder and director of Jewish Sacred Aging

14:35—Rabbi Dayle Friedman, director of Growing Older

18:57—Rabbi Rachmiel Rothberger, Jewish Community Liaison for Calvary Hospital

24:38—Rabbi Simcha Weintraub, rabbinic director of the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services

25:30—Rabbi Raphael Goldstein, former executive director of Neshama: Association of Jewish Chaplains

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