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Welcome to the fascinating world of Biology! Our courses are ideal for preparing students for medical school, dental school, or allied medical professions, as well as for the biotech and pharmaceutical industries. Our curriculum provides the foundation to understand basic biological phenomena of the living world in general, with special emphasis on human health and diseases.

Courses in principles of biology, microbiology, immunology, molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, anatomy, physiology, developmental biology, neuroscience, and bioethics are offered.
The Department of Biology encourages students also to participate in research projects with faculty members on and off campus. The department is further enhanced by numerous student-run science clubs, symposia, poster sessions, and many other related extracurricular activities.

Most students who major in biology pursue graduate-level studies in health sciences, where competition is intense. Yeshiva College students have an exceptionally high acceptance rate to graduate and professional schools, with most going on to the graduate school of their choice.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Biology is to prepare students for advanced studies in the biomedical sciences, particularly as related to human health care, and/or to pursue employment in various biology-related fields.  This is achieved by providing lecture and laboratory courses covering a spectrum of sub-disciplines within biology, providing majors with a comprehensive background in the principles of biology and hands-on skills in modern laboratory instrumentation, equipment, and procedures.

Program/Major Goals

1. Biology majors will be able to understand the main principles of biology, with an emphasis on the biomedical sciences.
2. Biology majors will be able to apply skills in laboratory techniques and knowledge of the scientific method to analyze scientific problems and to create their own scientific investigations.
3. Biology majors will be able to critically evaluate scientific literature according to established scientific criteria.
4. Biology majors will be able to express scientific ideas, both in written and oral communication.
5. Biology majors will be able to appreciate the connections between biology and other disciplines.

Program Information

For student advising or other questions about our department, please sign up to meet with a departmental advisor!
Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.
BIO 1011R Principles of Biology I—Lectures
2 credits
The primary aim of this course is to introduce the students to the classical phenomenon of life and living beings. Topics covered in lecture will include building blocks of living units, energy harvest, cell-to-cell communication and interaction with the environment, principles of cell division, and gene regulation.
Prerequisites: While there are no formal prerequisites, an understanding of high school biology, chemistry, and math is expected.
Corequisite: BIO 1011L
Satisfies NAWO or Natural Science requirements for all students.

BIO 1012R Principles of Biology II—Lectures
2 credits
The principle aim of this course is to introduce the students to the classical phenomenon and modern concept of life and living beings. Topics covered in the lecture and readings of primary literature will include- Systematics, phylogenies, and comparative Biology, viruses, prokaryotes, animal body and principles of regulation, various organ systems, animal development, and behavior.
Prerequisites: BIO1011R, 1011L
Corequisite: BIO 1012L
Satisfies NAWO or Natural Science requirements for all students.     

BIO 1011L, 1012L Principles of Biology—Laboratory
1 credit
Laboratory work to accompany lectures. Emphasizes scientific methods in biological research. Second semester emphasizes animal structure and function (4 hours).
Laboratory fee.
Corequisite: BIO 1011R, 1012R.

BIO 1376R Biochemistry—Lectures
3 credits
Structure and function of biological molecules, enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, metabolism, storage and transmission of genetic information, recombinant DNA technology, and selected topics such as membrane transport, hormone action, and muscle contraction.
Prerequisite: BIO 1012R&L, CHE 1213R& CHE1215L.
[Crosslisted as CHE 1376R]      

BIO 1376L Biochemistry—Laboratory
2 credits
Illustration of the properties of biochemical substances; design and analysis of experiments. Techniques include chromatography, electrophoresis, differential centrifugation, and various types of enzyme assays, including spectrophotometric and radioactive.
Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 1376R. [Crosslisted as CHE 1376L]
Laboratory fee.       

BIO 2601 Developmental Biology
2 credits
The study of animal development via experiments with Drosophila melanogaster, sea urchin, Xenopus laevis, chick, and mouse.  Morphogen gradients, intercellular signaling, and gene regulatory networks.  Differentiation and developmental potency, morphogenesis and cell movement, chromatin, stem cells and regenerative medicine.
Lecture: 100 minutes
Prerequisite: BIO 1012.      

BIO 3207C Cell Biology
4 credits
The cell is a fascinating, complex, and dynamic unit that forms the fundamental basis of unicellular and multicellular forms of life. Cells are constantly engaging with their environment and making active decisions. We will dissect these cellular processes throughout the semester, and delve deep into how the cell performs all of its functions and interacts with the environment as well as with other cells. Topics include: Cell structure, signal transduction, membrane dynamics, vesicle transport, cytoskeleton dynamics, cell migration, cell cycle, and stem cells
Lecture: 2 hours; lab: 4 hours.
Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites: BIO 1012, CHE 1046.     

BIO 3230C or 3230H Immunology
4 credits
This course is designed  to provide  an overview of the immune system as intended to introduce you to the complex yet fascinating subject of immunology. We are going to learn a detailed account of the workings of the immune system beginning with its cellular components, followed by a description of the structure of the reactants and an understanding of the formation and activation of the cellular and molecular components of the immune apparatus required to generate a response with reference to innate and acquired immunity.  Next, we will learn about cytokines, the soluble mediators that regulate immune responses and play a significant role in hematopoiesis. We would then learn in great detail about HIV infection, and the development of full-blown AIDS and evaluate the clinical consequences of resistance development with an emphasis to epidemiology. We will next focus on COVID-19 and scientifically understand the degree of virulence. Finally, we will try the understand the mechanism involved in allergic reaction and organ transplantation, and focus on the spectrum of microorganisms that challenge the immune system and how immune responses are mounted in a vigilant, orchestrated fashion to protect the host from infectious diseases with a discussion of immune-prophylaxis use of vaccines that protect us from a variety of pathogenic organisms
Lecture: 2 hours; lab: 4 hours.
Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites: CHE 1214, BIO 3207 or BIO 4023R & BIO4023L, and one other intermediate BIO course or permission of the instructor.      

BIO 3513C Genetics
4 credits
Experimental genetics, discussing in depth how alleles and genes interact with each other and how molecular lesions correlate with allelic behaviors.  Genetic linkage and recombination mapping, gene discovery via genetic screens on model organisms, pedigree and lod score analysis of human traits, and an introduction to population genetics.  Discussions of experimental sampling and statistical analysis. Research project with Drosophila.
Lecture: 150 minutes; lab: 200 minutes.
Laboratory fee.
Prerequisite: BIO 1012.       

BIO 3521C Molecular Biology
4 credits
Biological macromolecules; structure function correlation; molecular bonding and binding; structure of the gene; genome integrity, maintenance, and replication; fundamentals of the central dogma; gene expression; RNA and protein stability, ribozymes, RNAi, and CRISPR. 
Lecture: 150 minutes; lab: 200 minutes.
Laboratory fee.
Prerequisite: BIO 1012.       

BIO 3728C Physiology
4 credits
Physicochemical principles involved in life processes. Description of physiological mechanisms by which cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems maintain homeostasis through integration; mechanisms of chemical and electrical cell communication as well as neuro - physiological communication underlying short and long-term memory.  Analyze physiological data and interpret physiological scenarios using evidence-based reasoning, illustrate these principles in the physiological systems of vertebrates (lecture and laboratory sessions).
Lecture: 2 hours; lab: 4 hours.
Laboratory fee.
Prerequisite: BIO 1012.      

BIO 4931 Introduction to Neurobiology
2 credits
Topic of behavioral neuroscience from a broad perspective using an interdisciplinary approach and incorporates the most recent peer-reviewed articles in the field of behavioral neuroscience.Nerve cells and their organization into complex nervous systems; major concepts in neurobiology, including impulse conduction, synaptic transmission, sensory processing, and motor function. Current models of short- and long-term memories, the mind-body problem, learning mechanisms and plasticity, and sensory modalities. Topics also include scientific methodology, conceptual analysis, and innovative research methods such as optogenetics.
Lecture: 2 hours
Prerequisite: BIO 1012.       

BIO 4023C Microbiology
4 credits
This course introduces the basic principles of microbiology examining the microbes that inhabit the  human environment  and their effect on the biosphere. Analysis and exploration of the  this impact through the assessment of  the influence of commensal and pathogenic microbes that arise from our changing relationship with microbes in the 21st century, along with the  evaluation of  the  challenges and opportunities.  The course will give detailed insights into five major themes: Structure and function of microbes (cellular structures, metabolism, and growth), microbial genetics, microbial ecology, microbial diversity (prokaryotes, eukaryotes, viruses) and clinical microbiology (immunity, pathogenicity, epidemiology, control of microbes, and diseases).
Prerequisites: BIO 1012, CHE 1045, CHE 1046.
Recommended: CHE 1213, CHE 1214.
Lecture: 2 hours; lab: 4 hours.
Laboratory fee.       

BIO 4901, 4902 Independent Study
Meet with the Yeshiva College academic dean. Laboratory fee on an individual basis.      

BIO 4930; 4931 Current Topics in Biology
2 credits
Seminar in which students make presentations on selected subjects from current developments in the fields of microbiology, endocrinology, animal behavior, embryology, ecology, and environmental studies.
Lecture: 2 hours.
Prerequisites: BIO 1012R & BIO 1012L and permission of the instructor.       

BIO 4934 Biological Aspects of Bioethics
2 credits
Physiological, ecological, and epidemiological bases of decision making in the field of bioethics; definition of death; DNA recombinant research; pesticide use; demographic concerns; abortion; hazardous surgery; human experimentation; organ transplants; social obligation of the scientist; eugenics and euthanasia.
Prerequisites: BIO 1012 and two additional BIO courses.

       

Biology Major: 43-44 credits
REQUIRED COURSES (18 CREDITS)
BIOL 1011R, BIO 1011L, Principles of Biology 1 Lecture and Lab   5 Credits
BIO 1012R, BIO 1012L, Principles of Biology 2 Lecture and Lab     5 Credits
CHEM 1045R, General Chemistry 1 Lecture                                     3 Credits
CHEM 1046R and 1047L, General Chemistry 2 Lecture and Lab    5 Credits

REQUIRED BIO ELECTIVES (18 CREDITS)
Adv. Lab #1                                                                                        4 Credits

Adv. Lab #2                                                                                        4 Credits
Adv. Lab #3                                                                                        4 Credits
Adv. Lab #4                                                                                        4 Credits
Adv. Elective                                                                                       2 Credits

MATH REQUIREMENTS (7-8 CREDITS)
MAT 1410* or MAT 1412                                                                   4 Credits

MAT 1413 or STA 1021                                                                      3-4 Credits
*This introductory Calculus course is designed for students majoring in biology, pre-health sciences, or any other major except mathematics, computer, science, physics, engineering, or chemistry. It is a course for students who will not need calculus 2, but will take statistics. This course provides the fundamental concepts of the calculus in the context of applications to the health, life and social sciences, and beyond. The course prerequisite is pre-calculus-high school Algebra and Trigonometry.

**Courses within any given major or minor require a grade of a “C-“ or better to fulfill its requirement
Notes:

  1. All biology majors going on to graduate school or medical school should take Organic Chemistry (CHE 1213R, 1214R, 1215L), and Physics 1031-1032 R&L.
  2. Independent study and summer research in biology do NOT satisfy any biology requirements.
  3. Students planning to pursue advance study in the health sciences must be in contact with the YU pre-health advisor, Dr. James Camara.

Biology Minor: 20 credits
REQUIRED COURSES (10 CREDITS)
BIOL 1011R, BIO 1011L, Principles of Biology 1 Lecture and Lab   5 Credits
BIO 1012R, BIO 1012L, Principles of Biology 2 Lecture and Lab     5 Credits

REQUIRED BIO ELECTIVES (10 CREDITS)
Adv. Lab #1                                                                                        4 Credits
Adv. Lab #2                                                                                        4 Credits
Adv. Elective                                                                                       2 Credits     

Neer Asherie
 

Neer Asherie
Professor of Physics and Biology

 

 

 

Yaniv Cohen
​ 

  

Yaniv Cohen
Clinical Associate Professor of Biology 
 

 

 

 

 

Chayim Goldberg
 

Chayim Goldberg
Instructor of Biology

 

 

 

Sumanta Goswami
 

Sumanta Goswami
Emeritus Professor of Biology

 

 

 

Radhashree Maitra
 

Radhashree Maitra (co-Chair)
Professor of Biology
Lab website https://radhashreemaitra.wixsite.com/website-2

 

 

 

Edward Reichman
 

Edward Reichman
Rabbi Isaac and Bella Tendler Chair in Medical Ethics

 

 

 

Josefa Steinhauer
  

Josefa Steinhauer (co-Chair)
Professor of Biology
Lab website https://www.yu.edu/yeshiva-college/steinhauer-lab

 

 

Staff

 

Berta Chalouh

 

 

 

Yael Jacobs
 

Yael Jacobs

 

 

 

Please note: Links to external sites are offered as a convenience to visitors, as a starting point for exploration. Such sites are neither endorsed nor regulated by Yeshiva University, which accepts no responsibility for their content.
Internships
Summer Internships: A wide-ranging portal maintained by Columbia University, including links pertaining to New York and to locations across the United States.

Biology Internships: Another link-rich portal, this time from California State University, Channel Islands. Includes offerings in ecological biology, molecular/cellular biology, biomedical research and more.

NIH Student Training Opportunities: Programs offered by the National Institutes of Health.

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