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Ph.D. in Mathematics

Making the World Smarter, Safer and Healthier

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Eligible for

STEM-OPT
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Research
Faculty
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U.S. News & World Report

Top 100
University in the U.S.
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Forbes

Top 50
in Research in U.S. Universities
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The Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences at Yeshiva University emphasizes the many facets of complex systems, with the latter taking abstract or concrete forms such as financial markets, biological systems, quantum materials, meta-materials, fluids, plasmas, networks and big data. The tools of analysis pursued and developed by department faculty include topological, geometrical and functional analysis; optimization theory; complexity theory; partial differential equations of elliptic, hyperbolic and mixed type; noncommutative geometry; operator algebras; risk theory; and ergodic theory.

The Ph.D. program offers three tracks: 

  • Track I: Three years of study for students who enter with 60 credits of graduate coursework  
  • Track II: Four years of study for students who enter with 30 credits of graduate coursework 
  • Track III: Five years of study for students who enter with no previous graduate coursework  

A Ph.D. in mathematics is the first step to a job in materials science, dynamical systems, complex systems, and more. Students graduating from our Ph.D. program are prepared to pursue mathematics at the highest levels, as research mathematicians, university professors or applied mathematicians in business, industry or government. YU has an exceptional tradition and legacy in mathematical physics and an impressive track record of training research mathematicians. Famous alumni include Hillel Furstenberg (Abel Prize in Mathematics 2020), Benjamin Weiss, Michael Aizenman and Charles Peskin. We also leverage our excellent locations in midtown and uptown Manhattan to provide our students with internships, to build connections, and to land competitive jobs within and outside of academia. 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, median salaries as of 2019 for jobs with a Ph.D. were: actuary ($108,350); postsecondary education administrator ($95,410); mathematician and statistician ($92,030); operations research analyst ($84,810); and postsecondary mathematics and science teacher ($73,690). Generous scholarships and financial aid are available for a limited time. Come to New York City to study and network with the best. Apply now!  

Program Highlights

Solid and rigorous foundations built with real-world applications in mind

Guided journeys from abstract to concrete and from general to ultra-specialized mathematics

Hands-on experience with modern tools of analysis, including numerical techniques and software training

Immersive research experiences supported by external funding

Full Program Breakdown

The Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences at Yeshiva University emphasizes the many facets of complex systems, with the latter taking abstract or concrete forms such as financial markets, biological systems, quantum materials, meta-materials, fluids, plasmas, networks and big data. The tools of analysis pursued and developed by department faculty include topological, geometrical and functional analysis; optimization theory; complexity theory; partial differential equations of elliptic, hyperbolic and mixed type; noncommutative geometry; operator algebras; risk theory; and ergodic theory.

The Ph.D. program offers three tracks: 

  • Track I: Three years of study for students who enter with 60 credits of graduate coursework  
  • Track II: Four years of study for students who enter with 30 credits of graduate coursework 
  • Track III: Five years of study for students who enter with no previous graduate coursework  

A Ph.D. in mathematics is the first step to a job in materials science, dynamical systems, complex systems, and more. Students graduating from our Ph.D. program are prepared to pursue mathematics at the highest levels, as research mathematicians, university professors or applied mathematicians in business, industry or government. YU has an exceptional tradition and legacy in mathematical physics and an impressive track record of training research mathematicians. Famous alumni include Hillel Furstenberg (Abel Prize in Mathematics 2020), Benjamin Weiss, Michael Aizenman and Charles Peskin. We also leverage our excellent locations in midtown and uptown Manhattan to provide our students with internships, to build connections, and to land competitive jobs within and outside of academia. 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, median salaries as of 2019 for jobs with a Ph.D. were: actuary ($108,350); postsecondary education administrator ($95,410); mathematician and statistician ($92,030); operations research analyst ($84,810); and postsecondary mathematics and science teacher ($73,690). Generous scholarships and financial aid are available for a limited time. Come to New York City to study and network with the best. Apply now!  

Program Highlights

Solid and rigorous foundations built with real-world applications in mind

Guided journeys from abstract to concrete and from general to ultra-specialized mathematics

Hands-on experience with modern tools of analysis, including numerical techniques and software training

Immersive research experiences supported by external funding

Swipe to learn more!

The Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences at Yeshiva University emphasizes the many facets of complex systems, with the latter taking abstract or concrete forms such as financial markets, biological systems, quantum materials, meta-materials, fluids, plasmas, networks and big data. The tools of analysis pursued and developed by department faculty include topological, geometrical and functional analysis; optimization theory; complexity theory; partial differential equations of elliptic, hyperbolic and mixed type; noncommutative geometry; operator algebras; risk theory; and ergodic theory.

The Ph.D. program offers three tracks: 

  • Track I: Three years of study for students who enter with 60 credits of graduate coursework  
  • Track II: Four years of study for students who enter with 30 credits of graduate coursework 
  • Track III: Five years of study for students who enter with no previous graduate coursework  

A Ph.D. in mathematics is the first step to a job in materials science, dynamical systems, complex systems, and more. Students graduating from our Ph.D. program are prepared to pursue mathematics at the highest levels, as research mathematicians, university professors or applied mathematicians in business, industry or government. YU has an exceptional tradition and legacy in mathematical physics and an impressive track record of training research mathematicians. Famous alumni include Hillel Furstenberg (Abel Prize in Mathematics 2020), Benjamin Weiss, Michael Aizenman and Charles Peskin. We also leverage our excellent locations in midtown and uptown Manhattan to provide our students with internships, to build connections, and to land competitive jobs within and outside of academia. 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, median salaries as of 2019 for jobs with a Ph.D. were: actuary ($108,350); postsecondary education administrator ($95,410); mathematician and statistician ($92,030); operations research analyst ($84,810); and postsecondary mathematics and science teacher ($73,690). Generous scholarships and financial aid are available for a limited time. Come to New York City to study and network with the best. Apply now!  

Solid and rigorous foundations built with real-world applications in mind

Guided journeys from abstract to concrete and from general to ultra-specialized mathematics

Hands-on experience with modern tools of analysis, including numerical techniques and software training

Immersive research experiences supported by external funding

Internships and STEM-OPT

Gain industry experience in major companies, startups and the YU Innovation Lab through internships in the financial capital of the world – New York – that count toward your degree. Read more on the curriculum page or speak with an adviser.

Yeshiva University's Ph.D. in mathematics is a STEM-approved degree. International students may be eligible for up to 36 months of Optional Practical Training (OPT). The program also offers several opportunities for Curricular Practical Training (CPT). 

Interested in this program? Apply Now!

At a Glance

66-credit doctorate (36 credits above master’s)

Full-time or part-time

On-campus in New York City

Evening courses so that you can work full-time while completing your degree

Nationally and internationally recognized faculty

Small classes where you’ll get the attention you deserve

Helpful Links

Webinars

Join Our Community

Contact Us

Jared Hakimi 
Director of Graduate Admissions
jared.hakimi@yu.edu
646-592-4722
Schedule an Appointment 
 

Xavier Velasquez
Assistant Director of Graduate Admissions
xavier.velasquez@yu.edu
646-592-4737
Schedule an Appointment

Successful incoming students to the Ph.D. program have mathematical skills, which is often demonstrated by a master's degree and a strong master's thesis. Exceptional students may be admitted to the program without a master's degree and can earn an M.A. degree in mathematics while pursuing their Ph.D. studies. Those applicants must meet admissions requirements for both the M.A. and Ph.D. programs.

Most of our students have an undergraduate degree or other experience in economics, mathematics, computer science, physics, chemistry, engineering and similar quantitative majors. Some students also come from finance and behavioral sciences so long as they’ve taken several mathematics courses. The faculty believe it's academically important to include students from a variety of different backgrounds and with a diverse set of experiences. 

Prerequisites include one course in multivariate calculus (Calculus 3), one course in linear algebra and one course in statistics/probability with a grade of B or better. 

Application Requirements

Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and must submit the following items:

  • Online application
  • Official transcripts from all colleges or universities attended
  • Official GRE scores - Use Code 4778
  • Résumé
  • Personal statement describing your goals in pursuing a mathematics degree at the Katz School
  • Two academic or professional letters of recommendation
  • TOEFL or IELTS scores (for candidates whose bachelor's degrees were earned at a non-English-speaking institution)

If you have questions about your qualifications, make an appointment with an admissions director. We can discuss your background and do a preliminary transcript review. 

For up-to-date application deadlines, visit the Graduate Admissions page.

Financial Aid

All applicants are automatically considered for scholarships. You do not need to submit any additional information. Awards are determined during the application review process.  

Please schedule an appointment with an admissions director if you have questions about financial aid opportunities and financing your graduate degree. We can do a preliminary transcript review and discuss your admissions and financing options with the Katz School. 

Tuition & Fees

The Office of Student Finance maintains current tuition and fees and refund policies and procedures for all graduate programs.

Learn More

Helpful Links

Webinars

Join Our Community

Contact Us

Jared Hakimi 
Director of Graduate Admissions
jared.hakimi@yu.edu
646-592-4722
Schedule an Appointment 
 

Xavier Velasquez
Assistant Director of Graduate Admissions
xavier.velasquez@yu.edu
646-592-4737
Schedule an Appointment

Admissions & Financial Aid

Successful incoming students to the Ph.D. program have mathematical skills, which is often demonstrated by a master's degree and a strong master's thesis. Exceptional students may be admitted to the program without a master's degree and can earn an M.A. degree in mathematics while pursuing their Ph.D. studies. Those applicants must meet admissions requirements for both the M.A. and Ph.D. programs.

Most of our students have an undergraduate degree or other experience in economics, mathematics, computer science, physics, chemistry, engineering and similar quantitative majors. Some students also come from finance and behavioral sciences so long as they’ve taken several mathematics courses. The faculty believe it's academically important to include students from a variety of different backgrounds and with a diverse set of experiences. 

Prerequisites include one course in multivariate calculus (Calculus 3), one course in linear algebra and one course in statistics/probability with a grade of B or better. 

Application Requirements

Candidates must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university and must submit the following items:

  • Online application
  • Official transcripts from all colleges or universities attended
  • Official GRE scores - Use Code 4778
  • Résumé
  • Personal statement describing your goals in pursuing a mathematics degree at the Katz School
  • Two academic or professional letters of recommendation
  • TOEFL or IELTS scores (for candidates whose bachelor's degrees were earned at a non-English-speaking institution)

If you have questions about your qualifications, make an appointment with an admissions director. We can discuss your background and do a preliminary transcript review. 

For up-to-date application deadlines, visit the Graduate Admissions page.

Financial Aid

All applicants are automatically considered for scholarships. You do not need to submit any additional information. Awards are determined during the application review process.  

Please schedule an appointment with an admissions director if you have questions about financial aid opportunities and financing your graduate degree. We can do a preliminary transcript review and discuss your admissions and financing options with the Katz School. 

Tuition & Fees

The Office of Student Finance maintains current tuition and fees and refund policies and procedures for all graduate programs.

Program News

Welcome to Mathematics at Yeshiva University

M.A. and Ph.D. programs on-campus in New York City.

Welcome to Mathematics at Yeshiva University

Dr. Marian Gidea

Professor Named NSF Program Director

Read about how Dr. Gidea will guide national research

Professor Named NSF Program Director

Dr. Marian Gidea, a professor of mathematics, has been named program director of the Mathematical Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation.

“This distinction is awarded only to the most accomplished researchers in their respective fields,” said Dr. Paul Russo, dean of the Katz School and university vice provost. “His appointment as an NSF program director is further validation of his expertise as a national researcher and of Yeshiva University’s prestige as a research university, and we’re excited for him.”

In this annually rotating role, Dr. Gidea will be guiding and evaluating research at the national level. He will be involved in various programs on promoting new directions in science, engineering and technology, on supporting cutting-edge interdisciplinary research, and on influencing STEM education at the undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral levels.

In the M.A. degree in mathematics program, based in New York City, students gain a solid foundation in advanced mathematics and develop skills in mathematical modeling, numerical applications and data analysis in order to succeed in a variety of professions. A master’s degree in mathematics opens many doors to jobs in finance, technology, biomedicine and data analysis, among others. The master’s program also provides an excellent foundation for the Ph.D. program.

In the first year of the Ph.D. program, students take required courses and are expected to pass an advanced qualifying examination in real analysis, complex analysis and a third field chosen by the student in the intended area of research. After passing the qualifying exams, students can choose electives or reading courses in specialized topics and start to work on the research thesis with the guidance of a faculty adviser. Upon completion and successful defense of the thesis, the Ph.D. degree is awarded.

Yeshiva University has an exceptional tradition and legacy in mathematical physics and an impressive track record of training research mathematicians. Famous alumni include Hillel Furstenberg (Abel Prize in Mathematics 2020), Benjamin Weiss, Michael Aizenman and Charles Peskin.

Jobs in math occupations are expected to grow 27% through 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations, and will add about 56,100 jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This growth is based on the expectation that businesses and government agencies will continue emphasizing the use of big data. Math salaries were on average $90,410 as recently as 2019. Generous scholarships and financial aid are available for a limited time. Come to New York City to study and network with the best.

asteroids

NSF Study Measures Gravity on Asteroids

Read about the research's connection to spacecraft

NSF Study Measures Gravity on Asteroids

Three Katz School mathematics and physics researchers have developed a theoretical framework for predicting the possible shapes and gravitational fields of asteroids.

The results, published in the international journal Astrophysics and Space Science in March, can be useful for spacecraft engineers developing landing designs for irregularly shaped celestial objects. The research was funded by a $412,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

“One of the paper’s central challenges was to find mathematical expressions for representing gravity on the surface of an irregularly shaped asteroid, understanding that, unlike on Earth, gravity on these objects isn’t constant,” said Dr. Fredy Zypman, a professor of physics and co-author of the paper “Surface Gravity of Rotating Dumbbell Shapes” with Dr. Marian Gidea, professor and chair of the M.S. and Ph.D. mathematics programs, and Dr. Wai-Ting Lam, a doctoral alum in mathematics and now a member of the faculty at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women.

Asteroids in the solar system can take on a variety of shapes. They are of particular interest to scientists and explorers because they’re rich in minerals. “The exploration of the irregular gravity fields is compelling,” said Dr. Lam. “In particular, dumbbell shapes are among those that have been observed for comets and asteroids.”

The Katz School researchers focused on dumbbell-shaped, or peanut-shaped, asteroids whose gravitational fields can vary widely on their surfaces because their mass is unevenly distributed, as opposed to Earth, a nearly rounded object that produces a relatively constant gravitational field.

“Dumbbells are among the shapes that have been observed for comets and asteroids, making them both astronomically and mathematically interesting,” said Dr. Gidea. “Because the gravitational field of an asteroid is complicated, more irregular, spacecrafts have to be very careful on their approach.”

Examples of oddly shaped asteroids include Hektor, the largest Jupiter Trojan asteroid that has its own moon; the Comet Hartley 2, which was the target of a flyby in 2010 by NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft; and the trans-Neptunian Arrokoth, or Ultima Thule, located in the Kuiper Belt, which was the target of the New Horizons space probe’s flyby in 2019.

“In addition to the general results for gravity on peanut-shaped objects, we also created a model for the shape of Hektor that can be described by simple equations. This formula gives us a possible family of shapes for this type of asteroid,” said Dr. Gidea. “The peanut-shaped asteroids aren’t all identical. We had to figure out how many exist and the family of shapes, and then we figured out the gravity at any point in the vicinity of these shapes.”

Dr. Zypman said the researchers also studied how the shape of an asteroid changes depending on its rotation. “This knowledge is relevant for understanding how the asteroid formed initially, when the object was still malleable and approaching its current shape.”

Yeshiva University shield

YU Ranked 68th in Best National Universities

Read more about YU’s rankings

YU Ranked 68th in Best National Universities

Yeshiva University ranks 68th among National Universities and 33rd in Best Value Schools in the 2022 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges.

Read more about Yeshiva University's rankings in U.S. News & World Report.

Welcome to Mathematics at Yeshiva University

M.A. and Ph.D. programs on-campus in New York City.

Welcome to Mathematics at Yeshiva University

Dr. Marian Gidea

Professor Named NSF Program Director

Read about how Dr. Gidea will guide national research

Professor Named NSF Program Director

Dr. Marian Gidea, a professor of mathematics, has been named program director of the Mathematical Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation.

“This distinction is awarded only to the most accomplished researchers in their respective fields,” said Dr. Paul Russo, dean of the Katz School and university vice provost. “His appointment as an NSF program director is further validation of his expertise as a national researcher and of Yeshiva University’s prestige as a research university, and we’re excited for him.”

In this annually rotating role, Dr. Gidea will be guiding and evaluating research at the national level. He will be involved in various programs on promoting new directions in science, engineering and technology, on supporting cutting-edge interdisciplinary research, and on influencing STEM education at the undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral levels.

In the M.A. degree in mathematics program, based in New York City, students gain a solid foundation in advanced mathematics and develop skills in mathematical modeling, numerical applications and data analysis in order to succeed in a variety of professions. A master’s degree in mathematics opens many doors to jobs in finance, technology, biomedicine and data analysis, among others. The master’s program also provides an excellent foundation for the Ph.D. program.

In the first year of the Ph.D. program, students take required courses and are expected to pass an advanced qualifying examination in real analysis, complex analysis and a third field chosen by the student in the intended area of research. After passing the qualifying exams, students can choose electives or reading courses in specialized topics and start to work on the research thesis with the guidance of a faculty adviser. Upon completion and successful defense of the thesis, the Ph.D. degree is awarded.

Yeshiva University has an exceptional tradition and legacy in mathematical physics and an impressive track record of training research mathematicians. Famous alumni include Hillel Furstenberg (Abel Prize in Mathematics 2020), Benjamin Weiss, Michael Aizenman and Charles Peskin.

Jobs in math occupations are expected to grow 27% through 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations, and will add about 56,100 jobs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This growth is based on the expectation that businesses and government agencies will continue emphasizing the use of big data. Math salaries were on average $90,410 as recently as 2019. Generous scholarships and financial aid are available for a limited time. Come to New York City to study and network with the best.

asteroids

NSF Study Measures Gravity on Asteroids

Read about the research's connection to spacecraft

NSF Study Measures Gravity on Asteroids

Three Katz School mathematics and physics researchers have developed a theoretical framework for predicting the possible shapes and gravitational fields of asteroids.

The results, published in the international journal Astrophysics and Space Science in March, can be useful for spacecraft engineers developing landing designs for irregularly shaped celestial objects. The research was funded by a $412,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

“One of the paper’s central challenges was to find mathematical expressions for representing gravity on the surface of an irregularly shaped asteroid, understanding that, unlike on Earth, gravity on these objects isn’t constant,” said Dr. Fredy Zypman, a professor of physics and co-author of the paper “Surface Gravity of Rotating Dumbbell Shapes” with Dr. Marian Gidea, professor and chair of the M.S. and Ph.D. mathematics programs, and Dr. Wai-Ting Lam, a doctoral alum in mathematics and now a member of the faculty at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women.

Asteroids in the solar system can take on a variety of shapes. They are of particular interest to scientists and explorers because they’re rich in minerals. “The exploration of the irregular gravity fields is compelling,” said Dr. Lam. “In particular, dumbbell shapes are among those that have been observed for comets and asteroids.”

The Katz School researchers focused on dumbbell-shaped, or peanut-shaped, asteroids whose gravitational fields can vary widely on their surfaces because their mass is unevenly distributed, as opposed to Earth, a nearly rounded object that produces a relatively constant gravitational field.

“Dumbbells are among the shapes that have been observed for comets and asteroids, making them both astronomically and mathematically interesting,” said Dr. Gidea. “Because the gravitational field of an asteroid is complicated, more irregular, spacecrafts have to be very careful on their approach.”

Examples of oddly shaped asteroids include Hektor, the largest Jupiter Trojan asteroid that has its own moon; the Comet Hartley 2, which was the target of a flyby in 2010 by NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft; and the trans-Neptunian Arrokoth, or Ultima Thule, located in the Kuiper Belt, which was the target of the New Horizons space probe’s flyby in 2019.

“In addition to the general results for gravity on peanut-shaped objects, we also created a model for the shape of Hektor that can be described by simple equations. This formula gives us a possible family of shapes for this type of asteroid,” said Dr. Gidea. “The peanut-shaped asteroids aren’t all identical. We had to figure out how many exist and the family of shapes, and then we figured out the gravity at any point in the vicinity of these shapes.”

Dr. Zypman said the researchers also studied how the shape of an asteroid changes depending on its rotation. “This knowledge is relevant for understanding how the asteroid formed initially, when the object was still malleable and approaching its current shape.”

Yeshiva University shield

YU Ranked 68th in Best National Universities

Read more about YU’s rankings

YU Ranked 68th in Best National Universities

Yeshiva University ranks 68th among National Universities and 33rd in Best Value Schools in the 2022 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges.

Read more about Yeshiva University's rankings in U.S. News & World Report.

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