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Doctor of Psychology in School-Clinical Child Psychology

FERKAUF SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY

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Credits

110
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Degree level

Doctoral
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Course structure

Full Time
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Location

NYC
Bronx (Online and In-Person)
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The PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program’s mission is to provide doctoral-level training that integrates school and clinical psychology. Students are prepared to deliver psychological and psycho-educational services to adults, children, adolescents and their families in mental health settings, urban and suburban schools, early childhood centers, and other related learning environments. The Program requires students to understand and adhere to ethical and professional standards while applying their knowledge of developmental psychology, psychotherapy, education, assessment, developmental disabilities, family and systems theory, psychopathology, measurement, individual differences, neuropsychology, and school psychology. Required practica experiences include: year-long psychodynamic psychotherapy treatment, year-long CBT treatment through our clinic and conducting psychological, psychoeducational and neuropsychological evaluations.

In addition, students complete 3500 hours of externship and internship experiences in educational and mental health settings across the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut area. Program alumni work across the lifespan in schools, medical centers, mental health facilities, related agencies and in private practice.

Clinical Training

Our program offers dual exposure to Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. All students are required to complete two didactic CBT courses (in the second year) and a year-long practicum in CBT with children/adolescents in the Parnes Clinic (in the third/fourthyear), as well as two didactic psychodynamic courses (in the third year) and a year-long practicum in psychodynamic treatment with children/adolescents (in the third/fourth year). The child therapy practicum courses are 11 month experiences conducted through the Parnes Clinic and provide both group supervision provided by core faculty members and individual supervision provided by independent practitioners with expertise in CBT or Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with children, adolescents, and families.

Accreditation

This Psychology Health Service Provider program is accredited by the American Psychological Association as a Combined Clinical-School Psychology Program. The Program received a ten-year-accreditation from the American Psychological Association.  Our next site visit is scheduled for 2027. 

The Program is also approved by the National Association of School Psychologists.

If you have any questions, please contact us by email at
melanie.wadkins@yu.edu .

Statement

The faculty of the combined PsyD in School-Clinical Child Program at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology is committed to the practice of cultural humility, and we integrate this practice into our training. Cultural humility goes beyond the concept of cultural competence to include: 1. A personal lifelong commitment to self-evaluation and self-critique (intrapersonal), 2. Recognition of power dynamics and imbalances, a desire to fix those power imbalances and to develop partnerships with people and groups who advocate for others (interpersonal), and 3. Institutional accountability (Tervalon & Murray-Garcia, 1998). Across all levels of theoretical and applied training in the program, the Program faculty aims to prepare students to work clinically with people of diverse, intersecting identities to provide culturally affirming and strength-based mental health supports. We strive to do this both through specific courses and pedagogical practices as well as by reflecting on our own biases. We are committed to becoming a Program that trains psychologists in the framework of anti-racism and social justice to disrupt structural inequities and amplify the voices of those historically marginalized in our field. Tervalon, M., and Murray-Garcia, J. (1998). Cultural humility versus cultural competence: A critical distinction in defining physician training outcomes in multicultural education. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Undeserved, 9, 117-125.

The program's focus on individual differences, diversity and multiculturalism is embedded through all course work and practica. Several required courses specifically focus on these issues and other electives may be taken to strengthen students' knowledge and skills.The program also offers a 15-credit New York State approved Bilingual Extension to the Advanced Certificate in School Psychological Services.

We have been successful in attracting ethnic and multi-culturally diverse students as well as students who identify with other diversity characteristics. For example, 16% are students of color, 30% were born or raised outside of the United States, 19% were born outside the northeast, 13% are non-traditional/older students, 42% are married, 26% have children, 8.8% self-identify as GLBTQ, 38% had a prior career, 4.4% were professional athletes or artists and 37% are not Jewish.

Full Program Breakdown

The PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program’s mission is to provide doctoral-level training that integrates school and clinical psychology. Students are prepared to deliver psychological and psycho-educational services to adults, children, adolescents and their families in mental health settings, urban and suburban schools, early childhood centers, and other related learning environments. The Program requires students to understand and adhere to ethical and professional standards while applying their knowledge of developmental psychology, psychotherapy, education, assessment, developmental disabilities, family and systems theory, psychopathology, measurement, individual differences, neuropsychology, and school psychology. Required practica experiences include: year-long psychodynamic psychotherapy treatment, year-long CBT treatment through our clinic and conducting psychological, psychoeducational and neuropsychological evaluations.

In addition, students complete 3500 hours of externship and internship experiences in educational and mental health settings across the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut area. Program alumni work across the lifespan in schools, medical centers, mental health facilities, related agencies and in private practice.

Clinical Training

Our program offers dual exposure to Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. All students are required to complete two didactic CBT courses (in the second year) and a year-long practicum in CBT with children/adolescents in the Parnes Clinic (in the third/fourthyear), as well as two didactic psychodynamic courses (in the third year) and a year-long practicum in psychodynamic treatment with children/adolescents (in the third/fourth year). The child therapy practicum courses are 11 month experiences conducted through the Parnes Clinic and provide both group supervision provided by core faculty members and individual supervision provided by independent practitioners with expertise in CBT or Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with children, adolescents, and families.

Accreditation

This Psychology Health Service Provider program is accredited by the American Psychological Association as a Combined Clinical-School Psychology Program. The Program received a ten-year-accreditation from the American Psychological Association.  Our next site visit is scheduled for 2027. 

The Program is also approved by the National Association of School Psychologists.

If you have any questions, please contact us by email at
melanie.wadkins@yu.edu .

Statement

The faculty of the combined PsyD in School-Clinical Child Program at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology is committed to the practice of cultural humility, and we integrate this practice into our training. Cultural humility goes beyond the concept of cultural competence to include: 1. A personal lifelong commitment to self-evaluation and self-critique (intrapersonal), 2. Recognition of power dynamics and imbalances, a desire to fix those power imbalances and to develop partnerships with people and groups who advocate for others (interpersonal), and 3. Institutional accountability (Tervalon & Murray-Garcia, 1998). Across all levels of theoretical and applied training in the program, the Program faculty aims to prepare students to work clinically with people of diverse, intersecting identities to provide culturally affirming and strength-based mental health supports. We strive to do this both through specific courses and pedagogical practices as well as by reflecting on our own biases. We are committed to becoming a Program that trains psychologists in the framework of anti-racism and social justice to disrupt structural inequities and amplify the voices of those historically marginalized in our field. Tervalon, M., and Murray-Garcia, J. (1998). Cultural humility versus cultural competence: A critical distinction in defining physician training outcomes in multicultural education. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Undeserved, 9, 117-125.

The program's focus on individual differences, diversity and multiculturalism is embedded through all course work and practica. Several required courses specifically focus on these issues and other electives may be taken to strengthen students' knowledge and skills.The program also offers a 15-credit New York State approved Bilingual Extension to the Advanced Certificate in School Psychological Services.

We have been successful in attracting ethnic and multi-culturally diverse students as well as students who identify with other diversity characteristics. For example, 16% are students of color, 30% were born or raised outside of the United States, 19% were born outside the northeast, 13% are non-traditional/older students, 42% are married, 26% have children, 8.8% self-identify as GLBTQ, 38% had a prior career, 4.4% were professional athletes or artists and 37% are not Jewish.

Swipe to learn more!

The PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program’s mission is to provide doctoral-level training that integrates school and clinical psychology. Students are prepared to deliver psychological and psycho-educational services to adults, children, adolescents and their families in mental health settings, urban and suburban schools, early childhood centers, and other related learning environments. The Program requires students to understand and adhere to ethical and professional standards while applying their knowledge of developmental psychology, psychotherapy, education, assessment, developmental disabilities, family and systems theory, psychopathology, measurement, individual differences, neuropsychology, and school psychology. Required practica experiences include: year-long psychodynamic psychotherapy treatment, year-long CBT treatment through our clinic and conducting psychological, psychoeducational and neuropsychological evaluations.

In addition, students complete 3500 hours of externship and internship experiences in educational and mental health settings across the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut area. Program alumni work across the lifespan in schools, medical centers, mental health facilities, related agencies and in private practice.

Clinical Training

Our program offers dual exposure to Cognitive Behavioral and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. All students are required to complete two didactic CBT courses (in the second year) and a year-long practicum in CBT with children/adolescents in the Parnes Clinic (in the third/fourthyear), as well as two didactic psychodynamic courses (in the third year) and a year-long practicum in psychodynamic treatment with children/adolescents (in the third/fourth year). The child therapy practicum courses are 11 month experiences conducted through the Parnes Clinic and provide both group supervision provided by core faculty members and individual supervision provided by independent practitioners with expertise in CBT or Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with children, adolescents, and families.

Accreditation

This Psychology Health Service Provider program is accredited by the American Psychological Association as a Combined Clinical-School Psychology Program. The Program received a ten-year-accreditation from the American Psychological Association.  Our next site visit is scheduled for 2027. 

The Program is also approved by the National Association of School Psychologists.

If you have any questions, please contact us by email at
melanie.wadkins@yu.edu .

Statement

The faculty of the combined PsyD in School-Clinical Child Program at the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology is committed to the practice of cultural humility, and we integrate this practice into our training. Cultural humility goes beyond the concept of cultural competence to include: 1. A personal lifelong commitment to self-evaluation and self-critique (intrapersonal), 2. Recognition of power dynamics and imbalances, a desire to fix those power imbalances and to develop partnerships with people and groups who advocate for others (interpersonal), and 3. Institutional accountability (Tervalon & Murray-Garcia, 1998). Across all levels of theoretical and applied training in the program, the Program faculty aims to prepare students to work clinically with people of diverse, intersecting identities to provide culturally affirming and strength-based mental health supports. We strive to do this both through specific courses and pedagogical practices as well as by reflecting on our own biases. We are committed to becoming a Program that trains psychologists in the framework of anti-racism and social justice to disrupt structural inequities and amplify the voices of those historically marginalized in our field. Tervalon, M., and Murray-Garcia, J. (1998). Cultural humility versus cultural competence: A critical distinction in defining physician training outcomes in multicultural education. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Undeserved, 9, 117-125.

The program's focus on individual differences, diversity and multiculturalism is embedded through all course work and practica. Several required courses specifically focus on these issues and other electives may be taken to strengthen students' knowledge and skills.The program also offers a 15-credit New York State approved Bilingual Extension to the Advanced Certificate in School Psychological Services.

We have been successful in attracting ethnic and multi-culturally diverse students as well as students who identify with other diversity characteristics. For example, 16% are students of color, 30% were born or raised outside of the United States, 19% were born outside the northeast, 13% are non-traditional/older students, 42% are married, 26% have children, 8.8% self-identify as GLBTQ, 38% had a prior career, 4.4% were professional athletes or artists and 37% are not Jewish.

Program Director

Melanie Wadkins

Melanie J. Wadkins
melanie.wadkins@yu.edu
646-592-4375

Our Faculty

Quick Links


Academic Requirements

The Combined PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology program requires full-time attendance for five years. The course of study includes didactic courses, extensive practica and approximately 3,500 hours of externship and internship experiences. Students develop foundational and functional competencies to be able to work with children, adolescents, and caregivers in medical centers, hospitals, community mental health centers, schooling environments, and other settings.

Students must complete 110 credits (101 Credits Required; 9 Credits *Electives) including:  required courses, practica, externships, and internships and 9 credits of elective courses. Students can select to take more than two electives.

Course requirements are listed below. (r = required; e = elective)

Foundation Courses (33 Credits)

  • PSS 6801: Professional and Ethical Issues in Health Service Psychology
  • PSS 6199: Integrating Race and Gender in Multiculturalism

Assessment (r = 15 credits)

  • PSS 6131 Cognitive Assessment (r)
  • PSS 6131L Cognitive Assessment Lab (r)
  • PSS 6132 Psychoeducational Assessment (r)
  • PSS 6132L Psychoeducational Assessment Lab (r)
  • PSS 6153 Appraisal of Personality (r)

Typical and Atypical Development (r = 15 credits)

  • PSA 6066 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (r)
  • PSS 6250 Developmental Psychopathology (r)
  • PSA 6518 Lifespan Development (r)
  • PSS 6400 Neurodevelopmental Disorders (r)
  • PSS 6814 Adult Psychopathology and Assessment (r)

Research (r = 12 credits)

  • PSA 6280 Statistics I (r)
  • PSS 6286 Research Methods in Professional Psychology (r)
  • PSS 8915 Research Project I (r)
  • PSS 8916 Research Project II (r)

Research Labs (r=0 credits)

Student register for lab with their research mentor. Labs are taken for six semesters.

  • Ferkauf Anxiety Research Laboratory
  • Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Research Lab
  • Early Childhood Research Lab
  • Graduate Training and the Applied School-Clinical Child Psychology
  • Assessment and Consultation in School Psychology
  • Community-Partnered Research to Improve Services and Practice
  • Attachment & Psychotherapy Process

Other Required courses (r = 26 credits)

  • PSS 6071 Psychopharmacology (r)
  • PSS 6199 Integrating Gender and Race/Ethnicity in Multiculturalism (r)
  • PSS 6405 Social Psychology (r)
  • PSA 6601 History and Systems (r)
  • PSS 6801 Professional and Ethical Issues in School-Clinical Child Psychology (r)
  • PSS 6399 Biological bases of Behavior (r)
  • School-Clinical Child Psychology Externships I-VI (r) (6 credits - 1 credit each semester)
  • Doctoral Internship I-II (2 credits - 1 credit each semester)

Elective Courses: 9 credits

Students may select elective courses from the following program courses or others offered in the school provided they meet program conditions:

  • PSS 6289 Introduction to Qualitative Research (e)
  • PSS 6402 Neuropsychological Assessment and Lab (e)
  • PSS 6198 Contemporary Issues in School Psychology
  • PSS 6161 Assessment of Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Populations
  • PSS 6405 Advanced Seminar in Pediatric Neuropsychology
  • PSS 6224 Integrating Multiculturalism into Psychotherapy Practice
  • PSS 6622 Trauma in Childhood and Adolescence
  • PSS 6483 Substance Abuse and Treatment
  • PSM 6440 Couples and Family Counseling
  • PSS 8949 Bilingual and Multicultural School Psychology Internship Seminar

Bilingual Extension to the School Psychology Certificate

Students may apply for NYS Certification as a Bilingual School Psychologist if they meet the following program requirements:

Complete the following courses:

  • Integrating Gender and Race/Ethnicity in Multiculturalism
  • Contemporary Issues in School Psychology
  • Assessment of Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Populations
  • Consultation and Supervision
  • Practice of School Psychology with Bilingual and Multicultural Population - Externship

Externships

Externships Typically, students complete three externship experiences at a variety of sites, including schools, mental health facilities, hospitals, or infancy/early childhood centers. Each externship requires two or three days a week for 10-12 months. Students are is supervised by licensed psychologists at their externship sites and attends an externship seminar on campus for additional supervision. At the end of the fourth year, the student will have accumulated approximately 1,750 hours of supervised externship experiences.

Internships

The culminating training experience is the internship that occurs after all coursework has been completed and the student has completed Research Project I and has successfully proposed their Research Project II. All students are required to complete a full-time internship in either a school, mental health facility, or hospital setting, lasting between 1,500 and 1,750 hours (the equivalent of one full year). Supervision must be conducted by a licensed psychologist and meet State regulations.


More Information About the Learning/Curriculum Elements

Research

Students take courses in Statistics and Research Methods in Professional Psychology during their second and third years in the program. In their first year, students are matched with their faculty research advisor to begin their research. Students are required to complete Research Project I (or RPI) with the mentorship of their research advisor during their second year. RPI is a focused review of the literature that leads to Research Project II (also known as RPII) which is an empirical study, case study, qualitative research or a meta-analysis. Psychometrics are taught through several courses, including Research Methods and the five required courses in the Assessment sequence. This knowledge is applied during the development of the student’s research projects. It usually takes two to three years to complete the research requirements.

Ethical and Legal Standards

Students take Ethical and Professional Issues in Professional Psychology during their first year. These issues are also covered in all assessment and treatment courses and on externship and internship.

Individual and Cultural Diversity

Issues of individual and cultural diversity are embedded throughout the program’s course work, practica, externship and internship.  Training begins in the first semester’s class on Integrating Race and Gender in Multiculturalism and continues through all aspects of the program. 

Professional Values, Attitudes, and Behaviors

The development of professional values, attitudes and behaviors is a primary focus of all aspects of our training program. Faculty mentorship and comportment are critical elements for modeling of appropriate values, attitudes and behaviors. As such students have multiple sources for such mentorships including, peers, faculty advisors, research advisors, externship and internship supervisors and individual therapy supervisors. Many students will co-author papers and presentations with faculty and fellow students. 

Communication and Interpersonal Skills

These competencies are critical elements in all aspects of training; be it, assessment (being able to communicate assessment results to parents, teachers, and other professionals, in both written and oral formats; being able to do so in a respectful and empathic manner); treatment (being able to establish rapport, active listening, empathy, conduct treatment, have social-emotional awareness, stay regulated, be respectful of others, understand the cultural and diversity issues related to treatment process and assessment, etc.); consultation (working with parents, teachers in a collaborative manner); professional presentations (being able to deliver - orally and in written format - scholarly material to multi-disciplinary audiences); student participation in all coursework. 

Assessment

Assessment competencies are developed through a five-course sequence in the first and second years (Cognitive Assessment, Psychoeducational Assessment, Appraisal of Personality, and Practicum in Child Assessment I-II) that involve didactic and practica components that are graded for complexity. A sixth course in Neuropsychological Assessment is available as an elective in the third year. In addition, students in the second, third and fourth year externships work on-site under supervision in school and clinical settings. Finally, students complete a 1500-1750 hour pre-doctoral internship that includes extensive supervision of treatment and assessment activities. 

Treatment

Competencies are developed through a nine-course sequence that is graded for complexity through the second, third and fourth years in the program. Students develop beginning theoretical and practical competencies during the following second year courses: Working with Children and Families, Evidence-based Interventions with Youth I-II. In the third and fourth years, students complete two, year-long clinical practica in Practica in Child Therapy I-II: CBT; and Practica in Child Therapy I-II: Psychodynamic. They also take a year-long theory course entitled “Psychodynamic Theory and Practice with Children and Families.”  In addition, students in the third and fourth year complete 600-750 hour externships in clinical settings that are supervised by licensed psychologists on-site and that use live observation.  Finally, students complete a 1500-1750 hour pre-doctoral internship that includes extensive supervision of treatment and assessment activities. 

Supervision

Foundational competencies are developed during the second-year class on, Consultation and Supervision. Also, second year students are selected to supervise and mentor first year students in the first-year assessment classes. Similarly, third year students supervise second year students and fourth year students supervise third years. In addition, students have other opportunities to supervise students.

Consultation and Interprofessional/Interdisciplinary Skills

Second-year students take a year-long course in Consultation and Supervision followed by Consultation-Based Interventions. Both courses are taken concurrently with a year-long 500-600 hour externship in the schools. During the third and fourth-year externships and fifth year internship students continue to develop their consultation competencies in clinical and school settings. 

Students receive the Master of Science degree in School Psychology and are eligible for New York State Certification as a School Psychologist after completing a 60-credit course of study within the doctoral program. Students are also eligible for the Bilingual Extension to the School Psychology Certificate that permits them to become Certified Bilingual School Psychologists.

The Max and Celia Parnes Family Psychological and Psychoeducational Services Clinic (PDF) is our primary practicum facility. It provides facilities for assessment, diagnosis, psycho-educational remediation and interventions with children, adolescents and their families by students under faculty supervision. Externship, internship and other field-based experiences sequenced and integrated with the level of training are provided in schools, hospitals, mental health facilities and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine facilities.

Student Resources


Directory of Graduates

There are 927 alumni graduates (PDF)Employment and licensure information for 721 graduates are included in this directory (PDF). Inclusion in this directory should not be interpreted as the program's endorsement. Always exercise due diligence in such important decisions. We are very interested in maintaining updated information about all our graduates. Please contact us at anytime with current information.

Alumni Referral List

(Disclaimer: Inclusion on this list does not indicate a recommendation from the Program or its faculty)


Career Search Web Sites


Additional Important Links

Memberships and Licensure in New York State

Please review the following PDF files for the links we have compiled for you on related subjects.


Student and Faculty Highlights

Presentations, Publications, and Professional Achievements

Upcoming Conferences

TBA

Job Announcement

Highlights from Student, Faculty, and Alumni

The PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program Welcomes Dr. Jordan Bate

The PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program welcomed Dr. Jordan Bate to its faculty as an Assistant Professor of Psychology. Dr. Bate received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from The New School for Social Research, and a BA in History and Political Science from Williams College. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical psychology at Lenox Hill Hospital. Her research is broadly focused on applying attachment theory to child and parent-child psychotherapy. Beyond demonstrating treatment outcomes, she is interested in understanding the process of psychotherapy and exploring questions about what makes psychotherapy interventions effective, and how to effectively train clinicians and disseminate new treatments.
 
TEACHING AND RESEARCH INTERESTS:
Psychodynamic psychotherapy, attachment theory, mentalization, psychotherapy process, and the therapeutic alliance. She recently published, Bate, J., Bekar, O., & Blom, I. (2018). A Mother, A Baby, and Two Treatment Approaches: Discussing A Switch Case from CBT and Mentalization Perspectives. Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 17(4), 328-345.


Thomas Kui, a third year student in the PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program, has been selected as a fellow for the SCCAP Leadership Education to Advance Diversity (LEAD) Institute.

American Psychological Association's Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (SCCAP; APA Div. 53) created the Leadership Education to Advance Diversity (LEAD) Institute to foster professional development, networking, and leadership skills for graduate students and early career professionals.  Fellows at the LEAD institute will attend a full-day conference in Miami, Florida, in conjunction with the SCCAP sponsored Miami International Child and Adolescent Mental Health (MICAMH) conference, where invited guest speakers will address topics such as: leadership in the community, cultural sensitivity in practice, tips on publishing, and engaging in media psychology.


Dr. Greta Doctoroff, associate professor of psychology at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, recently published two articles. She co-authored an article in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology with Dr. Anil Chacko from New York University titled, “Engaging fathers in effective parenting for preschool children using shared book-reading: A randomized controlled trial.”  The study discusses the results of a program developed for the project called Fathers Supporting Success in Preschoolers (FSSP).  Doctoroff also recently published a study in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology that examined how mother-child interactions during a homework-like task related to elementary school children’s reading achievement titled, “Doing homework together: The relation between parenting strategies, child engagement, and achievement."  Read more about Dr. Doctoroff's articles in Faculty News.


Ferkauf alumna and NYU Child Study post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Samantha Busa, co-authored an article published by the Huffington Post on how rhetoric surrounding the military ban affects transgender youth.  The article titled, "What the New Military Ban Says to our Transgender Youth," discusses how systematic discrimination endangers the well being of transgender young people and their families.


Congratulations to Tiffany Rodriguez, a current fourth-year who was awarded  the  Yeshiva  University Point of Light award recognizing students, faculty, and  alum who exhibit exceptional  strength in their respective areas.

Ms. Rodriguez's award focused on asylum work conducted with Dr. Auerbach  and Dr. Salton of Yeshiva University. The asylum work included completing  psychological evaluations for those  seeking asylum as well as submitting the  affidavits to immigration court. 


Dr. Tracy Prout, assistant professor of psychology at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, has been busy.

Interviews
Dr. Prout recorded several interviews with The Austen Riggs Center, a therapeutic community which promotes resilience and self-direction in those with complex psychiatric problems. She spoke about her path to teaching and research, the compelling nature of psychodynamic psychotherapy, her teaching experience, how she became interested in working with children and her impression of Austen Riggs.

New Webinar
Kurtz Psychology Consulting PC serves the needs of children and families facing emotional, behavioral and other psychological challenges. Dr. Prout developed a webinar on the treatment she helped develop for children with externalizing behaviors, called “Regulation-Focused Psychotherapy for Children.”

Papers
Resilience, Defense Mechanisms, and Implicit Emotion Regulation in Psychodynamic Child Psychotherapy” in the Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy was co-authored by with three colleagues, one of which is Anthea Malone, a third-year Ferkauf student.

“Why Is It Easier to Get Mad Than It Is to Feel Sad? Pilot Study of Regulation-Focused Psychotherapy for Children” in the American Journal of Psychotherapy was co-authored with six Ferkauf students and graduates and reports results of a pilot study of three participants receiving regulation-focused psychotherapy for children.

Prospective Students

Quick Links


Academic Requirements

The Combined PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology program requires full-time attendance for five years. The course of study includes didactic courses, extensive practica and approximately 3,500 hours of externship and internship experiences. Students develop foundational and functional competencies to be able to work with children, adolescents, and caregivers in medical centers, hospitals, community mental health centers, schooling environments, and other settings.

Students must complete 110 credits (101 Credits Required; 9 Credits *Electives) including:  required courses, practica, externships, and internships and 9 credits of elective courses. Students can select to take more than two electives.

Course requirements are listed below. (r = required; e = elective)

Foundation Courses (33 Credits)

  • PSS 6801: Professional and Ethical Issues in Health Service Psychology
  • PSS 6199: Integrating Race and Gender in Multiculturalism

Assessment (r = 15 credits)

  • PSS 6131 Cognitive Assessment (r)
  • PSS 6131L Cognitive Assessment Lab (r)
  • PSS 6132 Psychoeducational Assessment (r)
  • PSS 6132L Psychoeducational Assessment Lab (r)
  • PSS 6153 Appraisal of Personality (r)

Typical and Atypical Development (r = 15 credits)

  • PSA 6066 Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior (r)
  • PSS 6250 Developmental Psychopathology (r)
  • PSA 6518 Lifespan Development (r)
  • PSS 6400 Neurodevelopmental Disorders (r)
  • PSS 6814 Adult Psychopathology and Assessment (r)

Research (r = 12 credits)

  • PSA 6280 Statistics I (r)
  • PSS 6286 Research Methods in Professional Psychology (r)
  • PSS 8915 Research Project I (r)
  • PSS 8916 Research Project II (r)

Research Labs (r=0 credits)

Student register for lab with their research mentor. Labs are taken for six semesters.

  • Ferkauf Anxiety Research Laboratory
  • Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Research Lab
  • Early Childhood Research Lab
  • Graduate Training and the Applied School-Clinical Child Psychology
  • Assessment and Consultation in School Psychology
  • Community-Partnered Research to Improve Services and Practice
  • Attachment & Psychotherapy Process

Other Required courses (r = 26 credits)

  • PSS 6071 Psychopharmacology (r)
  • PSS 6199 Integrating Gender and Race/Ethnicity in Multiculturalism (r)
  • PSS 6405 Social Psychology (r)
  • PSA 6601 History and Systems (r)
  • PSS 6801 Professional and Ethical Issues in School-Clinical Child Psychology (r)
  • PSS 6399 Biological bases of Behavior (r)
  • School-Clinical Child Psychology Externships I-VI (r) (6 credits - 1 credit each semester)
  • Doctoral Internship I-II (2 credits - 1 credit each semester)

Elective Courses: 9 credits

Students may select elective courses from the following program courses or others offered in the school provided they meet program conditions:

  • PSS 6289 Introduction to Qualitative Research (e)
  • PSS 6402 Neuropsychological Assessment and Lab (e)
  • PSS 6198 Contemporary Issues in School Psychology
  • PSS 6161 Assessment of Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Populations
  • PSS 6405 Advanced Seminar in Pediatric Neuropsychology
  • PSS 6224 Integrating Multiculturalism into Psychotherapy Practice
  • PSS 6622 Trauma in Childhood and Adolescence
  • PSS 6483 Substance Abuse and Treatment
  • PSM 6440 Couples and Family Counseling
  • PSS 8949 Bilingual and Multicultural School Psychology Internship Seminar

Bilingual Extension to the School Psychology Certificate

Students may apply for NYS Certification as a Bilingual School Psychologist if they meet the following program requirements:

Complete the following courses:

  • Integrating Gender and Race/Ethnicity in Multiculturalism
  • Contemporary Issues in School Psychology
  • Assessment of Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Populations
  • Consultation and Supervision
  • Practice of School Psychology with Bilingual and Multicultural Population - Externship

Externships

Externships Typically, students complete three externship experiences at a variety of sites, including schools, mental health facilities, hospitals, or infancy/early childhood centers. Each externship requires two or three days a week for 10-12 months. Students are is supervised by licensed psychologists at their externship sites and attends an externship seminar on campus for additional supervision. At the end of the fourth year, the student will have accumulated approximately 1,750 hours of supervised externship experiences.

Internships

The culminating training experience is the internship that occurs after all coursework has been completed and the student has completed Research Project I and has successfully proposed their Research Project II. All students are required to complete a full-time internship in either a school, mental health facility, or hospital setting, lasting between 1,500 and 1,750 hours (the equivalent of one full year). Supervision must be conducted by a licensed psychologist and meet State regulations.


More Information About the Learning/Curriculum Elements

Research

Students take courses in Statistics and Research Methods in Professional Psychology during their second and third years in the program. In their first year, students are matched with their faculty research advisor to begin their research. Students are required to complete Research Project I (or RPI) with the mentorship of their research advisor during their second year. RPI is a focused review of the literature that leads to Research Project II (also known as RPII) which is an empirical study, case study, qualitative research or a meta-analysis. Psychometrics are taught through several courses, including Research Methods and the five required courses in the Assessment sequence. This knowledge is applied during the development of the student’s research projects. It usually takes two to three years to complete the research requirements.

Ethical and Legal Standards

Students take Ethical and Professional Issues in Professional Psychology during their first year. These issues are also covered in all assessment and treatment courses and on externship and internship.

Individual and Cultural Diversity

Issues of individual and cultural diversity are embedded throughout the program’s course work, practica, externship and internship.  Training begins in the first semester’s class on Integrating Race and Gender in Multiculturalism and continues through all aspects of the program. 

Professional Values, Attitudes, and Behaviors

The development of professional values, attitudes and behaviors is a primary focus of all aspects of our training program. Faculty mentorship and comportment are critical elements for modeling of appropriate values, attitudes and behaviors. As such students have multiple sources for such mentorships including, peers, faculty advisors, research advisors, externship and internship supervisors and individual therapy supervisors. Many students will co-author papers and presentations with faculty and fellow students. 

Communication and Interpersonal Skills

These competencies are critical elements in all aspects of training; be it, assessment (being able to communicate assessment results to parents, teachers, and other professionals, in both written and oral formats; being able to do so in a respectful and empathic manner); treatment (being able to establish rapport, active listening, empathy, conduct treatment, have social-emotional awareness, stay regulated, be respectful of others, understand the cultural and diversity issues related to treatment process and assessment, etc.); consultation (working with parents, teachers in a collaborative manner); professional presentations (being able to deliver - orally and in written format - scholarly material to multi-disciplinary audiences); student participation in all coursework. 

Assessment

Assessment competencies are developed through a five-course sequence in the first and second years (Cognitive Assessment, Psychoeducational Assessment, Appraisal of Personality, and Practicum in Child Assessment I-II) that involve didactic and practica components that are graded for complexity. A sixth course in Neuropsychological Assessment is available as an elective in the third year. In addition, students in the second, third and fourth year externships work on-site under supervision in school and clinical settings. Finally, students complete a 1500-1750 hour pre-doctoral internship that includes extensive supervision of treatment and assessment activities. 

Treatment

Competencies are developed through a nine-course sequence that is graded for complexity through the second, third and fourth years in the program. Students develop beginning theoretical and practical competencies during the following second year courses: Working with Children and Families, Evidence-based Interventions with Youth I-II. In the third and fourth years, students complete two, year-long clinical practica in Practica in Child Therapy I-II: CBT; and Practica in Child Therapy I-II: Psychodynamic. They also take a year-long theory course entitled “Psychodynamic Theory and Practice with Children and Families.”  In addition, students in the third and fourth year complete 600-750 hour externships in clinical settings that are supervised by licensed psychologists on-site and that use live observation.  Finally, students complete a 1500-1750 hour pre-doctoral internship that includes extensive supervision of treatment and assessment activities. 

Supervision

Foundational competencies are developed during the second-year class on, Consultation and Supervision. Also, second year students are selected to supervise and mentor first year students in the first-year assessment classes. Similarly, third year students supervise second year students and fourth year students supervise third years. In addition, students have other opportunities to supervise students.

Consultation and Interprofessional/Interdisciplinary Skills

Second-year students take a year-long course in Consultation and Supervision followed by Consultation-Based Interventions. Both courses are taken concurrently with a year-long 500-600 hour externship in the schools. During the third and fourth-year externships and fifth year internship students continue to develop their consultation competencies in clinical and school settings. 

Students receive the Master of Science degree in School Psychology and are eligible for New York State Certification as a School Psychologist after completing a 60-credit course of study within the doctoral program. Students are also eligible for the Bilingual Extension to the School Psychology Certificate that permits them to become Certified Bilingual School Psychologists.

The Max and Celia Parnes Family Psychological and Psychoeducational Services Clinic (PDF) is our primary practicum facility. It provides facilities for assessment, diagnosis, psycho-educational remediation and interventions with children, adolescents and their families by students under faculty supervision. Externship, internship and other field-based experiences sequenced and integrated with the level of training are provided in schools, hospitals, mental health facilities and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine facilities.

Current Students

Student Resources


Directory of Graduates

There are 927 alumni graduates (PDF)Employment and licensure information for 721 graduates are included in this directory (PDF). Inclusion in this directory should not be interpreted as the program's endorsement. Always exercise due diligence in such important decisions. We are very interested in maintaining updated information about all our graduates. Please contact us at anytime with current information.

Alumni Referral List

(Disclaimer: Inclusion on this list does not indicate a recommendation from the Program or its faculty)


Career Search Web Sites


Additional Important Links

Memberships and Licensure in New York State

Please review the following PDF files for the links we have compiled for you on related subjects.


Student and Faculty Highlights

Presentations, Publications, and Professional Achievements

Upcoming Conferences

TBA

Job Announcement

Highlights from Student, Faculty, and Alumni

The PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program Welcomes Dr. Jordan Bate

The PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program welcomed Dr. Jordan Bate to its faculty as an Assistant Professor of Psychology. Dr. Bate received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from The New School for Social Research, and a BA in History and Political Science from Williams College. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical psychology at Lenox Hill Hospital. Her research is broadly focused on applying attachment theory to child and parent-child psychotherapy. Beyond demonstrating treatment outcomes, she is interested in understanding the process of psychotherapy and exploring questions about what makes psychotherapy interventions effective, and how to effectively train clinicians and disseminate new treatments.
 
TEACHING AND RESEARCH INTERESTS:
Psychodynamic psychotherapy, attachment theory, mentalization, psychotherapy process, and the therapeutic alliance. She recently published, Bate, J., Bekar, O., & Blom, I. (2018). A Mother, A Baby, and Two Treatment Approaches: Discussing A Switch Case from CBT and Mentalization Perspectives. Journal of Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychotherapy, 17(4), 328-345.


Thomas Kui, a third year student in the PsyD in School-Clinical Child Psychology Program, has been selected as a fellow for the SCCAP Leadership Education to Advance Diversity (LEAD) Institute.

American Psychological Association's Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (SCCAP; APA Div. 53) created the Leadership Education to Advance Diversity (LEAD) Institute to foster professional development, networking, and leadership skills for graduate students and early career professionals.  Fellows at the LEAD institute will attend a full-day conference in Miami, Florida, in conjunction with the SCCAP sponsored Miami International Child and Adolescent Mental Health (MICAMH) conference, where invited guest speakers will address topics such as: leadership in the community, cultural sensitivity in practice, tips on publishing, and engaging in media psychology.


Dr. Greta Doctoroff, associate professor of psychology at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, recently published two articles. She co-authored an article in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology with Dr. Anil Chacko from New York University titled, “Engaging fathers in effective parenting for preschool children using shared book-reading: A randomized controlled trial.”  The study discusses the results of a program developed for the project called Fathers Supporting Success in Preschoolers (FSSP).  Doctoroff also recently published a study in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology that examined how mother-child interactions during a homework-like task related to elementary school children’s reading achievement titled, “Doing homework together: The relation between parenting strategies, child engagement, and achievement."  Read more about Dr. Doctoroff's articles in Faculty News.


Ferkauf alumna and NYU Child Study post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Samantha Busa, co-authored an article published by the Huffington Post on how rhetoric surrounding the military ban affects transgender youth.  The article titled, "What the New Military Ban Says to our Transgender Youth," discusses how systematic discrimination endangers the well being of transgender young people and their families.


Congratulations to Tiffany Rodriguez, a current fourth-year who was awarded  the  Yeshiva  University Point of Light award recognizing students, faculty, and  alum who exhibit exceptional  strength in their respective areas.

Ms. Rodriguez's award focused on asylum work conducted with Dr. Auerbach  and Dr. Salton of Yeshiva University. The asylum work included completing  psychological evaluations for those  seeking asylum as well as submitting the  affidavits to immigration court. 


Dr. Tracy Prout, assistant professor of psychology at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, has been busy.

Interviews
Dr. Prout recorded several interviews with The Austen Riggs Center, a therapeutic community which promotes resilience and self-direction in those with complex psychiatric problems. She spoke about her path to teaching and research, the compelling nature of psychodynamic psychotherapy, her teaching experience, how she became interested in working with children and her impression of Austen Riggs.

New Webinar
Kurtz Psychology Consulting PC serves the needs of children and families facing emotional, behavioral and other psychological challenges. Dr. Prout developed a webinar on the treatment she helped develop for children with externalizing behaviors, called “Regulation-Focused Psychotherapy for Children.”

Papers
Resilience, Defense Mechanisms, and Implicit Emotion Regulation in Psychodynamic Child Psychotherapy” in the Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy was co-authored by with three colleagues, one of which is Anthea Malone, a third-year Ferkauf student.

“Why Is It Easier to Get Mad Than It Is to Feel Sad? Pilot Study of Regulation-Focused Psychotherapy for Children” in the American Journal of Psychotherapy was co-authored with six Ferkauf students and graduates and reports results of a pilot study of three participants receiving regulation-focused psychotherapy for children.

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