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WSSW Represented at the Council on Social Work Education’s Annual Program Meeting

In Fall 2022, WSSW was represented by three doctoral students and one MSW student at the Council on Social Work Education’s Annual Program Meeting in Anaheim, California.  Below are descriptions of the presentations that each of the students made. Congratulations to Michelle Bialeck, Andrea Maxi, Rikki Biggs, and Annette Clarke-Jones on their contributions to research in our profession!

The call for proposals to the 2023 conference is now open.  Please reach out to Dr. Lane (shannon.lane@yu.edu) if you are interested in submitting.

Interactive Workshop by Dr. Shannon Lane and Michelle Bialeck

Title: Responsible Advocacy: Social workers as partners, community members as experts

Abstract: This workshop provides discussions and hands-on techniques about teaching advocacy in the social work classroom.  We emphasize the ways that advocates, particularly in very vulnerable populations, have to prioritize serving as partners instead of experts.

Interactive Workshop by Dr. Shannon Lane and Michelle Bialeck

Title: Family – Peer Communication Patterns and its Impact on Financial well-Being: The Latent Class Analysis

 

 

 

 


Poster Presentation by Andrea Maxi and Rivka Biggs (Rikki).
Poster Presentation by Andrea Maxi and Rivka Biggs (Rikki).

Abstract: This study investigates different types of parent-peer communication and the extent to how it impacts their financial well-being. 3 types of communication were identified, Lack in discussion, Discussed-Savings, and Active discussion. Overall, family discussion on finance matter increase individuals’ financial well-being and skills, only discussed-savings group showed a significant moderation effect on the relationship between Financial skills and well-being. The findings provide a better understanding of the family communication pattern and its impact on individuals’ financial skills and financial well-being. Even though we expected family who actively discussed financial matters will have better financial well-being. However, we found those families who discussed about savings had higher financial well-being. This implies:

  • Because early education can have a critical impact on financial knowledge and literacy in adulthood, educational programs for youth are important7.
  • In exiting educational programs for youth (e.g., Jump$tart)8, implementing activities that encourage participating in different types of investment would be a worthwhile improvement.
  • Individuals who were exposed to savings account have shown a major impact on the youth on financial well-being and developing capabilities. An encouragement on savaging account is needed.
Poster Presentation by Annette Clarke Jones

Poster Presentation by Annette Clarke Jones

Title: Using a lived cross-cultural approach of an immigrant field instructor

Abstract: unavailable.