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The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program

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SPRING 2017 Honors Program Courses

Please see the Class Schedule for the current semester’s offerings. A brief description of the honors courses for the coming  semester is given below.

Non-Honors students interested in taking an Honors course should follow the Procedure to Take Honors Courses

ART

The Language of Architecture - 1633H


 Prof. Glassman

 Sec 361 Tu 6:45-9:30

    Goethe wrote, "I call architecture petrified music."  Architect Frank Lloyd Wright said, "The mother art is architecture. Without architecture of our own we have no soul of our own civilization."  Because the built environment combines a broad spectrum of visual elements, many consider architecture the most integrative of the arts.
    Building on these two characterizations of architecture, we shall study building systems from ancient Egypt to post-modern Paris. Our method will be comparative across eras and cultures. The result will be the basis for an architectural vocabulary and a greater consciousness of the built environment. We shall observe and describe the elements of architecture from domes to space frames, from open-air ventilation to full climate control, and from stone load-bearing walls to light-weight glass curtain walls. Forming the content will be not only work of masters of the discipline, but also architecture without architects. This introductory course will include illustrated lectures, discussion of theoretical texts, presentations by class members, and numerous on-site visits.
 
Outline of topics:
-Laying the foundations: ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome
-The Byzantine achievement
-Starting again: Carolingian & Romanesque
-The Gothic centuries
-Islamic, meso-American & non-western forms
-The Renaissance: ancient Rome reborn
-Baroque and anti-Baroque
-The return to classicism
-Period revivals
-Modernism and post-modernism

BIBLE 

Five Megillot - 2760H

Prof. Angel

Sec 311 T 1:05-2:45

 Course summary in progress

BIOLOGY

Topic: Cancer Biology - 3250H


Prof. Goswami

Sec 241 M W 4:30-5:20 | M 6:45-10:45

 Cancer Biology will provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the disease, starting with the processes which control normal growth and division in normal cells. The course then examines the cellular, molecular and genetic changes that cause cells to begin dividing in an uncontrolled fashion and subsequently to spread throughout the body. Molecular mechanisms of genes responsible for these carcinogenic changes will be discussed in considerable detail.

 This course includes elements of Cell Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology,
Immunology, Biochemistry, Virology, Pharmacology, Physiology, Developmental Biology, and Pathology. Cancer Biology is an advanced upper-division undergraduate course that not only encourages but requires active student participation. The laboratory component involves state-of the art technologies and will train students with techniques involved in research, diagnosis, treatment and spread of cancer. These techniques involve a lot of reading pre-lab preparation and in-lab involvement.

Chemistry of Metals in Biology - 1379H
 

Prof. Jiang

Sec 611 F 9:00-1:30

Cross-listed in Chemistry

 

Topic: Immunology - AIDS and Society - 3230H
 

Prof. Maitra

Sec 351 Tu 5:50-10:05

Since the first description of the disease in 1981, AIDS has had a greater impact on societies throughout the world than any other modern epidemic. AIDS is a disease that attacks the immune system by disabling the system that is designed to ward off infection. The disease-causing agent, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), is spread primarily by sexual contact. It is a retrovirus and its pathology and epidemiology present unique challenges for prevention and cure. The impact 

of AIDS on the both western and Africian societies has been reflected in the arts and culture of these societies. 

In this course we will examine in depth, the immune system in health and disease, the biochemistry and molecular biology of retroviruses, and how various societies have responded both positively and negatively to this disease through the arts and public health initiatives. 

Pre-requisites: CHE 1214R and any two of (BIO 3207R or 3207C) (BIO 4023R or BIO 4023C) or (BIO 3135R or BIO3135C) 

 

Neuropsychology - 3824H

 Prof. Shechter
Sec 461 W 6:45-9:30
Crosslisted with PSY 3824H

Course Description:  This course will introduce and explore core concepts related to neuropsychology, namely the biological basis of mental states and behavior. This will be done by critically and thoroughly reading clinical research studies and discussing them in class. Topics will include: attention, memory & learning, sleep and biological rhythms, decision making, language, emotions, stress, vision, aging & dementia, psychiatric & neurological disorders, and traumatic brain injury. Emphasis will be placed on research methodology and tools used for assessment. At each class, a brief introductory lecture on the topic will be given by the Instructor. At each class meeting, students will each present an original peer-reviewed journal article and lead a class discussion on the article.

Course Objectives and Learning Goals:  After completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) justify experimental methods and techniques used to study the brain, behavior, and mental states in humans; 2) describe physiological and neurobiological mechanisms underlying brain, behavior, and mental states; 3) perform a critical literature review of primary sources (peer-review journal articles) on these topics; 5) evaluate the findings of important research papers critically; 6) use the primary sources of research findings to compose a written critique of literature in the field.

 

CHEMISTRY

Advanced Laboratory Techniques - 1222H

Prof. Camara

Sec 331 T 3:00-4:15 | 6:45-10:45

This course will introduce students to advanced techniques in chemical synthesis and analysis. Familiarity with these techniques is vital to understanding and participating in modern chemical research. The course will train in basic air sensitive chemistry, organometallic chemistry, polymer chemistry, materials chemistry, mechanistic analysis, and asymmetric synthesis. Exploration of these topics will also involve exposure and training in Gel Permeation Chromatography, Heteronuclear NMR, 2D NMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography, and voltammetry. A series of six laboratory reports will sharpen student's scientific writing skills. Students will also gain experience conducting literature searches and reading primary literature. 

Chemistry of Metals in Biology - 1379H

Prof. Jiang

Sec 611 F 9:00-1:30

Cross-listed in Biology

CONTEMPORARY WORLD CULTURES

Face to Face: Modern Identities in Film - 1026H

Prof. Stewart

Sec 261 M 6:45-9:15

Course description in progress

 

CULTURES OVER TIME

Coffee and the Creation of Modernity - 1010H

Prof. Levin

Sec 231 M W 3:00-4:15

Coffee, the second most valuable commodity traded on world markets, is ubiquitous in contemporary American culture - so much so that it’s difficult to imagine that there was a time before coffee.  But there was.  Coffee wasn’t introduced into the Ottoman Empire until the end of the fifteenth century and into Europe until the seventeenth century. The world at the end of the eighteenth century looked very different than it had at the beginning of the sixteenth, and coffee had a lot to do with it. 

In this “Cultures Over Time” course we will examine the introduction and reception of coffee in the early-modern Ottoman world and, subsequently, in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe.  Using journalistic, literary, and visual sources we will explore how multiple societies responded to the introduction of coffee - a novel, foreign and exotic drink, as well as how the eventual European thirst for coffee impelled the development of a system of colonialism, or world trade.  Drawing on approaches from disciplines including history, sociology and anthropology, we will trace how coffee, an everyday object, transformed cultures into which it was introduced.  At the same time,  we’ll consider how the act of drinking coffee took on divergent political and cultural symbolism in disparate contexts, including the Ottoman world,  European nations, and colonial societies.   

The early modern world saw the birth of many aspects of culture and society that we consider “modern,” including “nightlife” in all its varieties; a bourgeois “middle class;” “consumerism,” “public space” and “globalization.” Together we’ll analyze the central role coffee and coffeehouses played in their creation and in the creation of “modernity.” 

 

ENGLISH

Writing About Medicine and Illness - 1660H


 Prof. Jacobson

 Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30

      In this course, we will be exploring the imperatives and the challenges of writing about illness: first as readers, and then—our ultimate focus—as writers.  Like other traumas, illness calls out to language and text-making—and, at the same time, pushes against the limits of language, narrative, and genre. Susan Sontag’s famous distinction between the “kingdom of the well” and the “kingdom of the sick” calls attention to the cognitive distance between the experience of illness and taken-for-granted realities of daily life.  Language remains a precious resource for crossing that divide, for deepening our understanding of what it means to be ill, and even for improving medicine’s ability to care for patients.
    In the first half of the course, we’ll be reading together a diverse set of texts that seek to evoke the experience of illness and of medical treatment—nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and graphic memoirs, as well as criticism—at the same time as students begin to create their own writing about both.  In the second half of the course, the balance of our class time will turn steadily toward a workshop format, for which students will take on increasingly more sophisticated writing assignments, present their work in class, and provide one another with constructive criticism.
    Course requirements:  weekly attendance; thoughtful, well-prepared participation in class discussion and workshop; three essays ranging from 3 to 5-8 pages; a final 20-page portfolio of revised writing; a series of short writing exercises and “writer’s reading journals”; completion of reading assignments, including peer writing for workshop.
TEXTS will most likely include Susan Sontag, Illness as Metaphor; Anatole Broyard, Intoxicated by My Illness; William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness; a selection of essays, short fiction, and poetry; a graphic memoir.
 

History of the Book - 3124H

Prof. Freedman

Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30

Today, computers and the internet are transforming the world of books in multiple ways, challenging previous notions of what a book is, what it is for, how it is transmitted, and who owns it. This is not the first time, however, that the world of books has been so radically transformed. This course seeks to provide some historical perspective on the transformations of the internet age by examining how the world of books developed in the aftermath of an earlier technological breakthrough: the invention in the mid-fifteenth century of printing with movable type.

 

HEBREW

Biblical Hebrew - 1326H

Prof. Bernstein

Sec 341 TR 4:30-6:10

Description: An intensive (4-credit) class in biblical Hebrew.

Textbook: Thomas O. Lambdin, An Introduction to Biblical Hebrew (Prentice Hall and others)

Requirements: Written translation from Hebrew to English every day; quizzes approximately every two weeks; midterm assignment; final examination.

Features of the Course:

·     Covers in a semester material which is usually covered in a year course, including material not usually covered in YC’s regular Hebrew sequence (1205-6; 1305-6).

·     Takes advantage of what students already know (but may not realize that they know!) about the Bible and its language, and engages in the discussion and analysis of real biblical text from the very beginning of the semester. One major outcome of the course will be the enhancement of students’ abilities to interpret familiar passages of the Bible because of the new tools they will be mastering.

·     Students will be introduced to a variety of tools employed in the philological study of the Hebrew Bible, such as reference grammars, concordances, and the like, which are not always employed in language courses on this level.

·     Students will have the opportunity to introduce regularly into the class questions about Hebrew language generated by work that they are doing in other courses. In this way, they will be engaging occasionally primary texts in Hebrew beyond those on which the textbook focuses and those included in the planned class sessions.

FULFILLS THE ONE-YEAR HEBREW REQUIREMENT AT YC (usually 1205-1206 or 1305-1306). OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE PLACED INTO HEB 1305 or WITH PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR. NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED ANY HEBREW COURSE LABELED XX06

BONUS: STUDENTS WHO GO ON FOR THE M.A. IN BIBLE AT BRGS WILL BE EXEMPT FROM THE ONE-YEAR BIBLICAL HEBREW REQUIREMENT THERE IF THEY ACHIEVE A GRADE OF B+ OR BETTER IN THIS CLASS.

 

HISTORY

History of the Book - 2124H

Prof. Freedman

Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30

Today, computers and the internet are transforming the world of books in multiple ways, challenging previous notions of what a book is, what it is for, how it is transmitted, and who owns it. This is not the first time, however, that the world of books has been so radically transformed. This course seeks to provide some historical perspective on the transformations of the internet age by examining how the world of books developed in the aftermath of an earlier technological breakthrough: the invention in the mid-fifteenth century of printing with movable type.

 

HONORS

Honors Thesis Seminar sessions focus on various aspects of the writing process and are shaped by the students' concerns and interests. Among other things, we may study process writing, disciplinary writing style differences, revision techniques, time management, and methods of organization. These seminars also help to create a scholarly community among our senior thesis writers.

 
Honors Thesis Proposal - 4977H
D. Holtz
Corequisite: HON 4978H

Honors Thesis Seminar I - 4978H

Dr. Holtz
Corequisite: HON 4977H or HON 4980H

4979H Honors Thesis Seminar II - 4979H
Dr. Holtz
Corequisite: HON 4980H or 4981H

Honors Thesis: Preparation - 4980H
Prof. Holtz
Corequisite: HON 4978H or 4979H

Honors Thesis: Writing - 4981H
Prof. Holtz
Corequisite: HON 4978H or 4979H

 

HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Deviant Behavior and Social Control - 1302H

Prof. Kimmel

Sec 341 TR 3:00-4:15

Social life is shaped by rules: customs, norms, and laws that govern and constrain human behavior. Throughout history – and across all of the social science disciplines – we have dealt with questions about what to do when those rules are broken. This course will address questions about rule-breaking: what it is, who does it, when it is done, how it is identified, and how others respond to it. We will examine many kinds of rules, from formal laws to informal expectations regarding behavior and identity, as well as many sorts of sanctions that are applied to deviant persons, groups, and behaviors. In the process, we will ask: What makes someone or something “deviant”? How do we distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate behavior? How and when is deviance acknowledged and labeled by others? How do differences among types of deviance inform the sanctions applied? Do we treat deviances differently depending on traits of the deviant? How is the concept of deviance linked to the distribution and use of power? 

INTERPRETING THE CREATIVE

Verdi and Shakespeare - 1024H


 Dr. Sugarman & Dr. Beliavsky


Time 621 F 10:00-12:30

 Cross-listed with Music

    This course will examine three works – Macbeth, Othello, and Shakespeare’s Falstaff plays, Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, and the Merry Wives of Windsor. These plays are the basis for Giuseppe Verdi’s extraordinary operas, Macbeth, Otello, and Falstaff, which the course will examine for their contributions to opera and the ways in which they intersect with, and meditate upon, Shakespeare and his legacy.
    The course will begin by grounding drama and opera in the genesis of the English Renaissance theater, the growth of London’s cultural prominence, the development of opera in the early Baroque period, and Verdi’s place in Europe’s Romantic art music tradition. Both Shakespeare and Verdi were men of the theater, and in their creation and staging of these works, they established important ways by which artists and audiences think about art and the world. Following this introductory overview, the course will examine questions of literary representation and musical signification, the psychologies and motivations of literary characters, how artists embody and react to their times, and how contemporary audiences can understand the aforementioned topics through the above representative works.
    In terms of Shakespeare, the course will focus on notable moments in Macbeth (e.g., the banquet scene, Lady Macbeth’s death scene), Othello, and the problem of Falstaff as a universal figure. In terms of Verdi, the course will explore how Verdi and his brilliant librettist (a major figure in his own right), Arrigo Boito, interpreted Shakespeare’s creative works through their textual and musical arrangements. We will use audio and video selections from these plays and operas to contextualize our discussions in the artistry of actors and singers, and in issues of staging, choreography, and scene and costume design.
    Please note that these operas feature women singing. Those who find this problematic in terms of Jewish Halakha should let the instructors know in advance. We will make every effort to treat this issue with sensitivity. Adherence to Halakha does not excuse students from fulfilling all coursework and assignment obligations.
 

JEWISH HISTORY

Medieval Jewish History - 1300H


 Prof. Karlip

 Sec 231 MW 3:00-4:15

Course description in progress

 

 History of NYC's Jews - 1465H


 Prof. Gurock

 Sec 611 F 9:30-12:00

 This course’s initial objective is to examine the history of the Jews of New York from their first meager numbers in the 17th century to, and through, its emergence by the late 19th century as the largest Jewish community in the world. The collateral objectives are to examine how New York’s Jewish history fits into the larger saga of the metropolis and compares with experiences of Jews elsewhere in America and the world While learning much about the metropolitan Jewish experience, we will examine if and why New York Jewish history was different from that of other Jewish communities while examining fully how events that took place elsewhere impacted upon this “local” Jewish experience. We will also frequently examine how N.Y. Jews lived with, among, and against, other ethnic and racial groups in this diversified city.

 

 History of Jewish Ethics - 1650H

Prof. Carmy

Sec 231 M W 3:00-4:15

Cross-listed with Jewish Philosophy

This course satisfies the 2nd semester slot in Jewish History requirement.
    Purpose of the course is to study Jewish ethics throughout the ages at a theoretical level. In the ancient period—Tanakh and Rabbinic literature—meta-ethical statements are rare; philosophical notions, if accessible at all, must be derived from the implications or presuppositions of texts. Medieval Jewish thinkers frequently employ current philosophical concepts derived from the Greek tradition, though often they decline such engagement and present their ideas as exegesis of the classical sources. The early modern literature continues these trends, while the thinkers of the last two hundred years utilize modern philosophical resources—like Kantianism, Hegelianism or existentialism—when they resort to philosophy. Those who do not are nevertheless self-conscious about their relationship to the classical sources. Consequently the methodology of the course must address several dimensions: the legitimacy of deriving philosophical doctrine from non-theoretical texts; the relationship of Judaism to changing philosophical movements in the non-Jewish world; and the challenges of producing constructive thought in an intellectual milieu where historical consciousness is unavoidable and constitutive.
    Tentative topics will include many of the following: How Biblical and rabbinic texts can or should govern theological formulations; Saadia Gaon; Hovot ha-Levavot; Maimonides,; Nahmanides; Rabbenu Yona; Maharal; R. M.H. Luzzato; Hermann Cohen, Religion of Reason from Sources of Judaism; R. Yisrael Salanter and other Musar writers; Martin Buber, “Imitation of God”; “Question of the Single One;” R. Kook, מוסר אביך; אורות הקדש ג'; R. Soloveitchik, Tradition 17:2; R. Aharon Lichtenstein, “Is There an Ethic Independent of Halakha?”

Requirements: Several short assignments + one culminating paper (10-12 pages) & final exam. 

 

JEWISH PHILOSOPHY

History of Jewish Ethics - 1650H

Prof. Carmy

Sec 231 M W 3:00-4:15

Cross-listed with Jewish History

 

MATHEMATICS

Mathematics of Finance - 53005

Dr. Gidea

Sec 361 T 6:30-9:00 

Text: Mark S. Joshi, The Concepts and Practice of Mathematical Finance, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press,  

ISBN: 9780521514088

This course provides a rigorous introduction to the mathematical foundations of finance. The following fundamental topics will be covered: risk, arbitrage, mathematical models for asset price movements (based on trees, PDEs, and martingales), pricing of financial derivatives, and hedging. It will also provide an elementary introduction to stochastic calculus, and to the Black-Scholes model. Computer experiments will be involved. The course aims to broaden the horizons of students in applied mathematics, to assist students who prepare for an actuarial mathematics career, and to provide conceptual background to students who are interested in a career in financial industry.

 

MUSIC

Verdi and Shakespeare 
 - 1024H

 Dr. Sugarman and Dr Beliavsky

Sec 621 F 10:00-12:30
Cross-listed with Interpreting the Creative

    This course will examine three works – Macbeth, Othello, and Shakespeare’s Falstaff plays, Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, and the Merry Wives of Windsor. These plays are the basis for Giuseppe Verdi’s extraordinary operas, Macbeth, Otello, and Falstaff, which the course will examine for their contributions to opera and the ways in which they intersect with, and meditate upon, Shakespeare and his legacy.
    The course will begin by grounding drama and opera in the genesis of the English Renaissance theater, the growth of London’s cultural prominence, the development of opera in the early Baroque period, and Verdi’s place in Europe’s Romantic art music tradition. Both Shakespeare and Verdi were men of the theater, and in their creation and staging of these works, they established important ways by which artists and audiences think about art and the world. Following this introductory overview, the course will examine questions of literary representation and musical signification, the psychologies and motivations of literary characters, how artists embody and react to their times, and how contemporary audiences can understand the aforementioned topics through the above representative works.
    In terms of Shakespeare, the course will focus on notable moments in Macbeth (e.g., the banquet scene, Lady Macbeth’s death scene), Othello, and the problem of Falstaff as a universal figure. In terms of Verdi, the course will explore how Verdi and his brilliant librettist (a major figure in his own right), Arrigo Boito, interpreted Shakespeare’s creative works through their textual and musical arrangements. We will use audio and video selections from these plays and operas to contextualize our discussions in the artistry of actors and singers, and in issues of staging, choreography, and scene and costume design.
    Please note that these operas feature women singing. Those who find this problematic in terms of Jewish Halakha should let the instructors know in advance. We will make every effort to treat this issue with sensitivity. Adherence to Halakha does not excuse students from fulfilling all coursework and assignment obligations.

PHILOSOPHY

Seminar: Computability and Logic - 4931H 


 Prof. Johnson


 Sec 231 M W 3:00-4:15

 
Course description in process

 

PHYSICS

Electromagnetic Theory - 1321H

 
Prof. Zypman

 Sec 631 F 11:00-1:30

This is a standard intermediate course in electromagnetic theory, which emphasizes mathematical treatment of the following topics.

  • Electrostatics: Fields and potentials. Conductors and boundary conditions. Poisson's equation. Different methods of solving Laplace's equation, and theory of multipole expansions.
  • Electrostatics in matter: Dielectrics , bound charges and Displacement fields. Theory of linear dielectrics.
  • Magnetostatics: Currents. Biot and Savart's law. Magnetic vector potential.
  • Magnetic fields in matter: Diamagnetism and paramagnetism. Ferromagnetism. Linear and non-linear media. The H field.
  • Electrodynamics and induction: Ohm's law. Faraday's law and applications. Maxwell's equations in vacuum and in matter. 
  • Special topics to be introduced if the level of the class makes it possible:

Covariant formulation of electromagnetism. Radiation. Potentials of moving charges.

Familiarity with vector calculus, vector differential operators and integral theorems is required.
Prerequisites: PHY 1042 and MAT 1510

 

Computational Methods in Physical Science - 3301H


Prof. Buldyrev

Sec 261 M W 6:45-8:00

Course description in process

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Civil Liberties - 2150H

 
Prof. Aroosi

 
Sec 231 M W 3:00-4:15

 Course description in progress.

 
USA-Israel Relations - 2397H

 
Ambassador Ayalon & Prof. Bevan

 Sec 241 M W 4:30-5:45

How will the Presidency of Donald Trump impact USA-Israel relations?  This will be the guiding question of this Honors course. The course will give a historical background of USA-Israel relations since the 1940's, emphasizing the USA's role in the U.N.'s recognition of Israel in 1948, the role of the Cold War in the USA's relationship thereafter to Israel, and the post-Cold War strategies toward the Middle East altogether. It will explore Israeli attitudes toward American involvement in the Middle East, the role of AIPAC in American foreign policy and Israeli governmental relationship to AIPAC, Israel's need to jump out of its own geographic and diplomatic isolation. The presence of Ambassador Danny Ayalon gives this course not only special authenticity but vivacity. This is a very special opportunity for students.

 

PSYCHOLOGY

Neuropsychology - 3824H

 Prof. Shechter
Sec 461 W 6:45-9:30
Crosslisted with BIO 3824H

Course Description:  This course will introduce and explore core concepts related to neuropsychology, namely the biological basis of mental states and behavior. This will be done by critically and thoroughly reading clinical research studies and discussing them in class. Topics will include: attention, memory & learning, sleep and biological rhythms, decision making, language, emotions, stress, vision, aging & dementia, psychiatric & neurological disorders, and traumatic brain injury. Emphasis will be placed on research methodology and tools used for assessment. At each class, a brief introductory lecture on the topic will be given by the Instructor. At each class meeting, students will each present an original peer-reviewed journal article and lead a class discussion on the article.

Course Objectives and Learning Goals:  After completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) justify experimental methods and techniques used to study the brain, behavior, and mental states in humans; 2) describe physiological and neurobiological mechanisms underlying brain, behavior, and mental states; 3) perform a critical literature review of primary sources (peer-review journal articles) on these topics; 5) evaluate the findings of important research papers critically; 6) use the primary sources of research findings to compose a written critique of literature in the field.

 

Topics: Research in Social Development - 4930H

 Prof. Isaacs
 Sec 361 T 6:45-9:30
 Course description in progress.

SOCIOLOGY

Deviant Behavior and Social Control - 2302H

Prof. Kimmel

Sec 341 TR 3:00-4:15

 Social life is shaped by rules: customs, norms, and laws that govern and constrain human behavior. Throughout history – and across all of the social science disciplines – we have dealt with questions about what to do when those rules are broken. This course will address questions about rule-breaking: what it is, who does it, when it is done, how it is identified, and how others respond to it. We will examine many kinds of rules, from formal laws to informal expectations regarding behavior and identity, as well as many sorts of sanctions that are applied to deviant persons, groups, and behaviors. In the process, we will ask: What makes someone or something “deviant”? How do we distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate behavior? How and when is deviance acknowledged and labeled by others? How do differences among types of deviance inform the sanctions applied? Do we treat deviances differently depending on traits of the deviant? How is the concept of deviance linked to the distribution and use of power?

 

SPANISH

Intermediate Spanish: Honors - 1202H

Dr Bazet-Broitman

Sec TBA

This is the second semester of a two-semester Intermediate course. Intermediate Spanish II is designed to further develop the four language skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish, and to deepen the students' exposure to the variety of cultural aspects within the Hispanic world, with a particular focus on literature. The primary objective of both sequences is to help the students reach a level in their command of the language that would allow them to communicate proficiently both in speaking and writing. The methodology used in the course will be primarily communicative, that is, actually using what the students already know and presenting the new material in authentic contexts. The complete course is intended to present students with a variety of Spanish and Latin American literary forms and authors. However, Intermediate II particularly focused on this aspect and students will have to read and analyze original texts by well-known Hispanic authors to a greater degree than what was required from them in Intermediate I. There is also an emphasis in writing and students will have several written assignments in the course of the semester. During the course of the semester there will be also be cultural activities both inside and outside of YC. These activities will be related to various aspects of the Hispanic cultural life in New York City and will include visits to museums and attendance to performances of plays by Hispanic authors. Participation in these activities will be mandatory and students will be expected to prepare a brief summary of each activity with their personal impressions. To the maximum extent possible, both sequences of the course will be taught in Spanish. For students in the old curriculum, this course fulfills the Gen Ed Literature requirement. For students in the new curriculum, Intermediate II can be counted as an INTC.