• Hebrew

  • Courses

    Students will be assigned to the appropriate Hebrew level based on a Hebrew Placement Exam. Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

     

    HEBREW (HEBR)

    HEBR 1101/1102 Elementary Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Develop essentials of oral expression and basic reading and writing skills, with a focus on the foundations of grammar and acquisition of frequently used words in daily life.

    HEBR 1103/1104 Lower Intermediate Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Further development of basic reading comprehension, writing and speaking skills; enhance basic grammatical skills; and expand vocabulary.

    HEBR 1105, 1106 Intermediate Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Further expansion of vocabulary, oral expression, and reading comprehension and writing skills; reinforce the rules of grammatical structures of Hebrew; use understanding of grammar to analyze Hebrew context.

    HEBR 1107, 1108 Intermediate Hebrew III, IV
    3 credits

    Review Hebrew’s grammatical structures, with focus on their utilization for reading comprehension, writing and speaking skills. Students will be introduced to unedited Hebrew texts (journalistic and scholastic) to further expand their vocabulary.

    HEBR 1205, 1206 Upper Intermediate Hebrew I, II
    3 credits

    Students will be introduced to modern Hebrew literature—poetry and prose—with a focus on the history of Eretz Yisrael since the early 20th century. They will analyze poetry using grammatical knowledge and implicit word meaning and develop the skill of writing a critical paragraph in Hebrew. Speaking skills will also be cultivated.

    HEBR 1233, 1234 Conversational Hebrew
    1 credit

    Development of fluency in speaking Hebrew. For upper intermediate-advanced level students.

    HEBR 1321, 1322 Biblical Hebrew
    3 credits

    Review of basic forms; principles of phonology, morphology and syntax.

    HEBR 1409, 1410 Advanced Hebrew Conversation
    3 credits

    Spoken modern Hebrew, using advanced textbooks and Israeli newspapers.

    HEBR 2525; 2526 Medieval Hebrew Poetry
    3 credits

    Selected readings in the Hebrew poetry of the Middle Ages, with emphasis on Yehudah Halevi, Shmuel HaNagid, Solomon Ibn Gabirol and Abraham Ibn Ezra.

    HEBR 2567, 2568 Modern Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    The movement for Enlightenment (Haskalah) and the national renaissance, with readings in the major writers of the period.

    HEBR 2669 The Hebrew Short Story of the 20th Century
    3 credits

    Detailed examination of the short story genre, its main characteristics, motifs, themes, and techniques as reflected in the works of various 20th-century writers.

    HEBR 2687 Foundations of Renaissance Literature
    3 credits

    The works of Ahad Ha’am, Bialik, and Mendele.

    HEBR 2688 20th-Century Literature
    3 credits

    Hebrew prose and poetry of the 20th century; literary analysis of selected readings of the major modern authors.

    HEBR 2697; 2698 Contemporary Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    Hebrew prose and poetry since 1948; literary analysis of selected readings of the major authors.

    HEBR 2709 Literature of the Holocaust
    Examination of literary responses of three generations of prominent Hebrew writers to the Shoah in poetry and prose.

    HEBR 2710; 2719; 2720; 2729; 2730; 2739; 2740 Topics in Modern Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    Each semester examines a specific area, such as Israelis and Jews, center and margins in contemporary Israeli society, literature of the Holocaust, women’s literature, war and peace in contemporary Israeli literature, portrayal of the Arab in Israeli literature, the kibbutz in Israeli literature, Zionism in Hebrew literature.

    HEBR 2810 Agnon
    3 credits

    Critical study of Agnon’s short stories that recount the hardship of Jewish life in the Diaspora and the struggles to recreate a new Jewish identity in the Land of Israel since the early 20th century.

    HEBR 2927 Biblical Themes in Modern Hebrew Literature
    3 credits

    Examination of the different ways modern Hebrew poets since the beginning of the 20th century relate to their Biblical heritage and how the Bible affects their identity as modern Hebrew poets.

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