• Classical Languages

  • Courses

     » Please see the Schedule of Classes for the current semester’s offerings.

    Greek

    GRE 1101 or 1102 Elementary Greek
    3 credits

    Emphasis on understanding Greek literature in the original, with grammar employed only as a means to that end. First semester: systematic survey of the language and reading of simple sentences taken from Greek literature; second semester: continuation of the language survey, with reading of Plato's Apology and Crito.

    GRE 1231 or 1232 Homer and Drama
    3 credits

    First semester: selections from Homer's Iliad or Odyssey; second semester: one play of Aeschylus and one of Sophocles.
    Prerequisite: GRE 1101 or 1102 or equivalent.

    GRE 1373 or 1373H Greek Myths and Their Influence
    3 credits

    Introductory survey course. Examines the major Greek myths pertaining to creation, the flood, Prometheus, the Olympian gods and goddesses (notably Athena, Aphrodite, Apollo, Hermes, Dionysus, and Demeter), and the major heroes (notably Heracles and Odysseus). Covers their origins; the cults and festivals connected with them; the light cast upon them by archaeology; the ties linking the myths to one another; their versions in Homer, Hesiod, the Greek tragedies, and Ovid's Metamorphoses; as well as their modern adaptations in literature. No knowledge of Greek is required.

    GRE 2201, 2202, 2203 or 2204 Advanced Greek
    3 credits

    Content, from among the following, varies with the needs and interests of the class: Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days; elegiac, iambic, and lyric poetry (Callinus, Tyrtaeus, Mimnermus, Solon, Xenophanes, Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho, Anacreon, Simonides); Pindar's odes; Aristophanes' comedies; Herodotus's The Persian War from the Histories; Thucydides' The Peloponnesian War; Lysias's orations; Demosthenes' orations; Plato's Republic; and Aristotle's The Nicomachean Ethics. May be taken for two or more successive years.
    Prerequisite: GRE 1231; 1232 or equivalent.

    Latin

    LAT 1101 or 1102 Elementary Latin
    3 credits

    First semester: systematic survey of the language and reading of simple sentences taken from Latin literature. Second semester: continuation of the language survey; readings from Nepos, Cicero, Catullus, Horace, Pliny the Younger, Martial, Phaedrus, and in medieval Latin.

    LAT 1231 or 1232 Intermediate Latin
    3 credits

    First semester: readings from Ciceros greatest speeches, philosophical works, and letters; various other famous writers, such as the historians Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, and Ammianus Marcellinus; Pliny the Younger's letters; the biographers Nepos and Suetonius; Cato the Elder on agriculture; Celsus on medicine; Seneca's philosophical works; Petronius's satire; Apuleius's Metamorphoses; inscriptions; and Ovid's account of mythology. Second semester: selections from the Aeneid, with emphasis on its poetic qualities and on Virgil's status and influence.
    Prerequisite: two years of high school Latin or LAT 1101 or 1102.

    LAT 2201, 2202, 2203 or 2204 Advanced Latin
    3 credits

    Content, from among the following, varies with the needs and interests of the class: Plautus's and Terence's comedies, Cicero's philosophical works, Lucretius's On the Nature of Things, Catullus's poems, Livy's History of Rome, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Seneca's philosophical works, Martial's epigrams, Petronius's Satyricon, Juvenal's satires, Tacitus's historical works, Suetonius's biographies of the Roman emperors. May be taken for two or more successive years.
    Prerequisite: LAT 1231, 1232 or equivalent.

    LAT 4901 or 4902 Independent Study
    Meet with the Yeshiva College academic dean.

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