• Clinical Psychology Program, PsyD

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    CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM NEWS AND EVENTS

    Fall 2014

    The Clinical PsyD. program had an average match rate of 93% over a four-year period.  Further, the Clinical Program’s match rate was in the top 3 for Clinical PsyD. programs nationwide. Take a look at the APPIC's report on match rates and compare across programs.

    William Salton, Ph.D. was featured in a New York Times article about therapists' offices.

     

    Summer 2014


    Kate Walsh
    Clinical PsyD Program Welcomes Drs. Walsh and Wheaton to the Faculty: Kate Walsh, Ph.D. will be joining the clinical program (PsyD) at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University/Albert Einstein College of Medicine in September, 2014 as Assistant Professor of Psychology. She received her B.A. from Boston University and her PhD from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She completed her internship at the National Crime Victims Center, Medical University of South Carolina and is currently completing a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Epidemiology at Columbia University, where she conducts research focused on trauma exposure and mental health outcomes. Dr. Walsh's research interests intersect the areas of gender-based violence (GBV), posttraumatic stress disorder, and substance use disorders. She has a particular focus on mechanisms including emotion dysregulation and neuroendocrine reactivity that explain why some individuals exposed to GBV go on to develop a host of negative sequelae while others do not. She has received funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to identify biopsychosocial pathways to developing substance use and risky sexual behaviors. She was also recently invited to submit a funding proposal to the Department of Defense to develop an intervention to prevent sexual harassment and assault in the military, and she has a number of ongoing projects focused on sexual assault in other settings (college, prison, adolescents). Dr. Walsh was also the recipient of two competitive National Institute on Drug Abuse travel awards to present research at national meetings of the American Psychological Association and the College of Problems on Drug Dependence. 

     Michael WheatonMichael Wheaton, Ph.D will also be joining the clinical program (PsyD) at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University/Albert Einstein College of Medicine in September, 2014 as Assistant Professor of Psychology. Dr. Wheaton received his BA from Cornell University and his PhD in clinical psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He completed his Internship at the Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois, Chicago and is completing a postdoctoral position in the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University. Dr. Wheaton's research interests focus on the psychopathology and treatment of obsessive compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs), with a particular emphasis on hoarding disorder. His research program aims to explore the cognitive, behavioral, and neurobiological factors that contribute to these disorders. Dr. Wheaton has a particular interest in cognitive behavioral therapy for OCD, including exposure and response prevention (EX/RP). He has served as a therapist on an NIMH-funded trial of EX/RP for OCD and is interested in investigating variables (e.g., biomarkers, therapist skills) that predict response to EX/RP. Dr. Wheaton was awarded a traineeship by NIMH to work on genetic and phenotypic investigations of OCD and received a grant from NYSPI to examine the neural correlates of CBT for OCD. Dr Wheaton has received a grant from the International Obsessive Compulsive Foundation to study Affective Responses and Information-Processing in Compulsive Hoarding. He was also awarded a Career Development Travel Award from ADAA to present his research at their annual Conference. 

    Lata McGinn, Ph.D. wrote an op-ed for the Huffington Post about the prevalence of and causes behind suicide in middle-age and older white men. The piece was in response to Robin Williams's suicide on August 11, 2014.

    Carl Auerbach, Ph.D. co-published an article called "Pathways to Resilience in Post-genocide Rwanda: A Resources-Efficacy Model" in the journal Intervention. Dr. Auerbach and his fellow researchers examined resilience in post-genocide Rwanda utilizing interviews that were analyzed via qualitative research procedure. Their results suggest a “resources-efficacy-resilience” model, in which the availability of resources creates self-efficacy which facilitates resilience, i.e. the ability overcome past trauma and create a successful life. Read the article.

    William Salton, Ph.D. led a workshop "Cultural Nuances: How to Manage the Challenges and Opportunities of Understanding and Working With Patients From a Different Culture" through the Metropolitan Institute for Training in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy on June 21, 2014. Dr. Salton examined how cultural differences between patient and therapist can be explored and how they can ultimately enhance treatment.

    Lata McGinn, Ph.D.served as part of a Division 12 task force which delineated a model graduate curriculum   for teaching evidence based practice in Clinical Psychology. The curriculum focuses on teaching students to base clinical practice and applied work on research, teaching critical thinking and lifelong learning, and integrating experiential with didactic learning in all training.

    Spring 2014

    Jamie Schumpf, Psy.D., presented at the Annual APPIC conference on the clinical program's affiliated internship and new training program federally funded by HRSA on May 2, 2014, in Austin, Texas. The CTP-SPMI is a collaborative training program that provides a continuum of competent care to underserved, severely and persistently mentally ill populations with an internship at Bronx Psychiatric Center. The program is finishing its first training year and serves as a model for other institutions to create affiliated programs.   

    Snake Photo2The Clinical PsyD. Program was awarded the 2014 Varda Shoham Clinical Scientist Training Initiative grant from the APA's Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology (SSCP - Section III of Division 12, Society for Clinical Psychology) on April 23, 2014. Meant to help bridge the gap between research and clinical practice, the grants are awarded to training programs to launch new projects or support ongoing initiatives that effectively integrate science and practice in their training program. The Clinical PsyD. program received the grant to further enhance their initiative to integrate clinical practice and research by using clinical data from the training clinic to improve ongoing practice. Read YU Today post about the Clinical PsyD. Program's award.

    Samantha Stein '16 and Eriko Nagao '16 received the Hans Strupp Memorial Student Travel Award to present their poster at the Society for Psychotherapy Research conference in Copenhagen in June. Their poster will be on the influence of therapist-trainee personal therapy and rejection sensitivity on facilitative interpersonal skills.

    Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D. was featured as one of five Master Clinicians at the William Alanson White Institute Educational Intensive, June 2014. The Master Clinicians -- Dr. Goldklank, Dr. Mark Blechner, Dr. Philip Bromberg, Dr. Jacqueline Ferraro, and Dr. Edgar Levenson -- exhibited a "live supervision" to an international audience: they offered five vantage points over the course of five days on conducting psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic therapy from a contemporary Interpersonal/Relational perspective. Dr. Goldklank also served on last year's panel of Master Clinicians at the William Alanson White Institute Educational Intensive.

    Luis Nobrega '16 received a Travel Award granted by Section VIII (Couple and Family Therapy and Psychoanalysis) of Division 39 of APA to attend Div. 39 Spring Conference in New York, 2014. The annual Spring Conference holds over 60 symposia and workshops about innovations in psychoanalytic thinking. Luis also received a Travel Award to attend the Div. 39 Spring Conference in 2013 by the Multicultural Concerns Committee and Sexualities and Gender Identities Committee of Division 39 of APA. 

    Elaine Lavin '18 presented a poster with her fellow researchers at the inaugural conference of the Society for Affective Science in Washington DC in April 2014. They examined dyadic patterns of emotional experience that mark distressed couples. Elaine also presented a poster on ambiguous loss and parenting stress associated with boundary ambiguity in families with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in October 2013 at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Orlando, Florida.

     Anna Van Meter, Ph.D. was granted the Child Intervention, Prevention and Services (CHIPS) Award, a National Institute of Mental Health-funded training program for early career investigators pursuing research related to prevention and intervention for child psychiatric disorders. The award includes a five-day intensive Summer Research Institute as well as funds to visit mentors and to attend professional conferences. 

    Anna Van Meter, Ph.D.  also participated in two different symposia at the Annual Conference of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders in Seoul, South Korea, in March 2014. Dr. Van Meter presented data on different models of risk during the prodromal phase of bipolar disorder, as well as various cross-cultural indicators of suicidality and self-injury in young adults. 

    William Salton, Ph.D. presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Psychology Training Clinics in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on February 28, 2014. He discussed treatment of long-term in graduate student training clinics using a case study of five long-term patients at the Parnes Clinic. 

    Carl Auerbach, Ph.D.    gave a talk at Brown University on February 5, 2014 titled "Trauma and governance in post-genocide Rwanda." He spoke about the ways Rwandans have addressed the unusual challenge of perpetrators and victims living together after a mass murder. Dr Auerbach also had a letter-to-the-editor published in the New York Times in response to Jeffrey Gettleman's article about Rwanda's president, Paul Kagame. Dr. Auerbach's letter defended the governing policy of President Kagame. 

    William Arsenio, Ph.D.    was recently selected to be on the Board of Directors for the Jean Piaget Society for the 2014-2017 term. The society, established in 1970, has an international, interdisciplinary membership of scholars, teachers and researchers interested in exploring the nature of the developmental construction of human knowledge. 

    The internship match rate for the Ferkauf Clinical Psychology Program    was 95 percent. By comparison, the national average was 81 percent. As usual, our students at all top sites including Bellevue, Brooklyn VA, LIJ/Northshore, Manhattan VA, Mt. Sinai, New York-Presbyterian, St. Lukes Medical Center, Montefiore and Yale. Seventy percent matched with one of their top three choices.

    Carl Auerbach, Ph.D. and William Salton, Ph.D. introduced a course “Working With Asylum Seekers” that taught students how to psychologically evaluate asylum seekers and write reports that would be presented in court on their behalf. Students worked in pairs to complete three asylum evaluations, interviewing people from across the globe with different pleas for asylum. After meeting with the clients, students wrote up an affidavit, or a written account of what they determined about the client based on the interview, which was then given to a lawyer, who submitted it into evidence in support of the client’s case. The course emphasizes to students how their role as an expert witness in an asylum case is different than that of a clinician with clients. Read more about the course

    Fall 2013


    Lata McGinn, Ph.D. and co-researchers presented at the 47th annual convention of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Psychotherapies in Nashville, TN November 21-24, 2013 . One clinical round table,Tailored Treatment Techniques & Difficult Differential Diagnoses, focused on differentiating OCD from a range of other psychological conditions. Specific attention was given to the similarities and differences in symptomatology between each disorder and OCD and to creating individualized treatment plans for treating specific OCD obsessions (i.e. fear of harming others vs. sexual obsessions). A poster presentation, Does OCD identification really matter? Results show: Yes, discussed misdiagnosis of OCD. Approximately half (50.5%) of the 208 primary care physicians, who participated in the study, misdiagnosed the OCD vignette they randomly reviewed. The results from this study found that the participants who correctly identified the OCD vignette were 1.5 to 8 times more likely to recommend an empirically supported OCD treatment. Dr. McGinn and researchers also presented these findings at the International Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Foundation Conference in July 2013.  

     

    Clinical students in the second, third, and fourth year classes attended the ABCT conference in Nashville, TN, in November 2013.ABCTlarge
     

    Richard Zweig, Ph.D. was appointed Chair of the Council of Professional GeroPsychology Training Programs (CoPGTP). The mission of the COPGTP is to promote state-of-the-art education and training in geropsychology, to provide a forum for sharing resources and advancements, and to support activities that prepare psychologists for competent and ethical geropsychology practice. Dr. Zweig has also joined the Editorial Board of Clinical Gerontologist.

    Alumni Alla (Kryss) Palma, Diana Bronshteyn and Alina Feyder presented posters about their research on Depression and Social Isolation in Russian Immigrant Older Adults at the Annual Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America in New Orleans, LA, in November 2013. 

    William Arsenio, Ph.D.   was one of three faculty participants in the "Blood, Muscle, Bone: The Anatomy of Wealth and Poverty" project being conducted at Wesleyan University this Fall. The project brings together two nationally known dance choreographers, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar and Liz Lerman (a previous MacArthur prize winner), students, and researchers who focus on the consequences of economic inequality. Using collaborative methods, this group is exploring how dance choreography can be combined with social science research to examine and communicate the effects of poverty and inequality on physical and psychological health. Dr. Arsenio's contribution focuses on how growing US income inequality has affected the educational and psychosocial development of children and adolescents; This stems from the research he and his students conduct on understanding and moral evaluations of institutional fairness and how that relates to the "possible selves" that adolescents envision for themselves in the near future. The multi-disciplinary project will culminate in a performance-based teach-in on November 11th that will utilize a lively and provocative tool of past protest movements. 

    Anna Van Meter, Ph.D. presented at American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry conference on October 22-27 in Orlando, Fl. Her talk, "A Tantrum By Another Other Name: Two Disorders of Chronic Irritability," looked at Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder, a DSM 5 diagnosis, and compared it to the existing diagnosis of cyclothymic disorder in youth. Additionally, she presented two posters: Meta-Analysis of the Discriminative Validity of Caregiver, Teacher, and Youth Checklists for Assessing Pediatric Bipolar Disorder and Updated Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Characteristics of Mania in Children and Adolescents (of which she is lead author). She co-chaired a symposium called "Emotion Dysregulation Across Disorders of Youth."

    Gregory Hinrichsen, Ph.D. Adjunct Faculty member of the Ferkauf Older Adult Program, joined the Editorial Boards of Clinical Gerontologist and The Gerontologist. 

    Catherine Eubanks-Carter, Ph.D.   moderated a panel called "Understanding the Rupture Resolution Process and Assimilative Integration through Qualitative and Quantitative Methods," at the 2013 North American Society for Psychotherapy Research meeting in Memphis, TN, October 17-19. As part of the panel, Dr. Eubanks-Carter presented a paper "Understanding Assimilative Integration from a philosophical, individual, and clinical perspective," which she co-authored with student Jessica Grossman.

    Lata K. McGinn, Ph.D.   published an article in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy on a Status Update on the Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder.

    William Salton, Ph.D., presented at the New York State Psychological Association's Biannual Substance Abuse Conference on October 4, 2013, in New York City. The conference focused on how experienced psychologically-informed clinicians actually work with patients, examining different modalities, treatment strategies, and approaches. Dr. Salton's presentation was called "Non-manualized Substance Abuse Psychotherapy: Drawing from the Patient's Own World (With a Little Help from Willie Nelson). Dr. Salton also spoke at BITS Pilani Univeristy in Goa, India, in July; his presentation was called "Possible pitfalls in cross cultural research interviews."

    Summer 2013


    Catherine Eubanks-Carter, Ph.D. is part of a team of investigators who were recently awarded a $10,000 grant from the Fund for Psychoanalytic Research of the American Psychoanalytic Association for their research in the relationship between the psychotherapy process, attachment, and reflective functioning. The research team, affiliated with the Beth Israel Brief Psychotherapy Research Program, was led by Primary Investigator Jeremy Safran of the New School, Dr. Eubanks-Carter (co-Primary Investigator), and Chris Muran (Co-Investigator) of Adelphi University. The study is entitled "Assessing relational change in psychotherapy: New applications of measures for assessing attachment and reflective functioning." Ferkauf student Erin King will utilize some of the funds to support her PsyD. II research.

    Briana Auman '16 was awarded a $2000 Small Grants Research Award by the Society for Psychotherapy Research to support her dissertation with Dr. Eubanks-Carter. Working with an ongoing project at Beth Israel, her dissertation will examine the relationship between working alliance, psychotherapy process, and outcome in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Brief Relational Therapy. 

    Landon Zaki '14 published a study in the September issue of Behavior Therapy. Her study, entitled "Emotion differentiation as a protective factor against nonsuicidal self-injury in borderline personality disorder," investigated whether differentiation of negative emotion was associated with lower frequency of nonsuicidal self-injury acts and urges. The researchers found that rumination predicated higher rates of NSSI acts and urges in participants who exhibited difficulty in differentiating their negative emotions. 

    Rachel Edelman '15 and Erin King '15   are campus representatives for the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS). As part of this role, they will be communicating with the student body about Action Alerts from the APA, so that students are aware of issues facing psychologists and have an opportunity to take action if they choose to. They will also be informing students of other important issues related to the APA.

    Julia (Dryzcimski) Buckley '09 serves as the President-Elect/Vice President of the Central Coast Psychological Association (CCPA), her local chapter of the California Psychological Association. She will become as President of CCPA in 2014 and currently also serves as the Co-Chair of the Marketing and Public Relations committee of CCPA. 

    Sarah Fraser '15 has been awarded the Margaret Floy Washburn Fund fellowship for the past three years from Vassar College, her undergraduate institution. 

    Lata K. McGinn, Ph.D. was invited to be as a Keynote Speaker at the 7th World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies in Lima, Peru in July, 2013. She provided a status update on Social Anxiety Disorder, speaking about the changes in the DSM-V regarding the diagnosis of the disorder, cultural influences and trends in the diagnosis, the latest etiological research, and an overview of different treatments. She also discussed the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. 

    Kristina McGuire 2Alumna Kristina J. McGuire, PsyD. was featured in the June 2013 issue of APA publication Monitor On Psychology. The article features how Dr. McGuire works at preventing unnecessary re-hospitalizations through intensive care management at North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health system. Dr. McGuire targets the highest-risk patients to pinpoint any psychological problems that could potentially interfere with medical treatment. 

    Anna Van Meter, Ph.D. joined the faculty in the Fall of 2013. Dr. Van Meter received her doctorate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed her clinical internship at University of Illinois at Chicago. She received her undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College. Dr. Van Meter is engaged in research on the classification and assessment of bipolar spectrum disorders, with a special focus on cyclothymic disorder. She has conducted validation studies of cyclothymic disorder in two youth clinical samples, and is the author of multiple papers and chapters reviewing the literature and empirical data on cyclothymic disorder across the lifespan. Dr. Van Meter is also interested in how the intersection of biological environmental risk factors influences the developmental trajectory of mood disorders. She has used meta-analytic techniques to study differences in the prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorders internationally. Additionally, she conducted a large study investigating the relation between a biomarker for environmental sensitivity, emotion regulation, and disordered mood. In the future, she plans to continue this line of research to develop a model of how emotionally sensitive temperaments can predispose some individuals to clinically significant episodes of disturbed mood. 

    2013-2012


    Michelle Zarowitz '17   received a Travel Award granted by Section VIII (Couple and Family Therapy and Psychoanalysis) of Division 39 (Division of Psychoanalysis) to attend the annual APA Division 39 Spring Meeting in 2013.

    New Harbinger Publications released alumna Jenny Taitz's first popular audience book, End Emotional Eating. The book introduces the latest scientifically supported theories and strategies to manage emotions to live purposefully in an accessibly and entertaining manner. Unlike many books on the topic of eating, Dr. Taitz's book focuses on attention, regulating emotions and distress, and participating rather than feeling preoccupied by feelings and food. Read more about the book and Dr. Taitz by viewing her website, drjennytaitz.com.

    On September 25, 2012, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology's Clinical Program (PsyD) was awarded a grant for $470,782 by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius through the Mental and Behavioral Health Education and Training Grant (MBHETG) program, which was authorized as a part of the Affordable Care Act. HRSA received hundreds of applications for this grant and only eleven clinical programs across the country were awarded this grant, which will be used to support three-years of pre-doctoral internship training.The Clinical Program (PsyD) at Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology (FGSP), Yeshiva University (YU), in collaboration with Bronx Psychiatric Center (BPC ) will use this grant to create an innovative SPMI training program (The Collaborative Training Program to Provide a Continuum of Competent Care to Underserved, Severely and Persistently Mentally Ill Populations CPT-SPMI) that will include the creation of an affiliated internship program. The CTP-SPMI will provide comprehensive training to graduate students in the assessment and treatment of severe and persistent mental illness. Through this unique partnership, the two programs will increase competent care to underserved, severely and persistently mentally ill populations by (a) directly training students in the clinical program and (b) by creating an exportable curriculum that will be disseminated to other graduate clinical programs and internship programs, with the hope that they will use this training model to develop similar programs.

    Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University have found that personality traits like being outgoing, optimistic, easygoing, and enjoying laughter as well as staying engaged in activities may also be part of the longevity genes mix. The study is titled "Positive attitude towards life and emotional expression as personality phenotypes for centenarians," and was aimed at detecting genetically-based personality characteristics by developing a brief measure (the Personality Outlook Profile Scale, or POPS) of personality in centenarians. The POPS was developed by lead author Kaori Kato, Psy.D., now at Weill Cornell Medical College, who validated it through comparisons with two previously established measures of personality traits. Other authors of the study were Nir Barzilai, M.D., the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair of Aging Research, director of Einstein'sInstitute for Aging Research and co-corresponding author of the study, Richard Zweig, Ph.D., assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Einstein and director of the Older Adult Program at Ferkauf's Clinical Psychology Psy.D. program, and Gil Atzmon, Ph.D., assistant professor of medicine and of genetics at Einstein.

    A book edited by William Arsenio, Ph.D. and his co-author, Elizabeth Lemerise Emotions, Aggression, and Morality in Children: From Development to Psychopathology, is being offered as a continuing education program by the American Psychological Association. The book and seven CE credit classes draw "largely from social information processing and moral domain theories, [and] the chapters demonstrate how early affective experiences and relationships provide a foundation for children's subsequent social cognitive understanding of victimization, harm, and moral intentionality." The book includes chapters by leading American and European scholars on theoretical foundations, empirical reviews, and interventions involving aggressive problems in children and adolescents. 

    Lata McGinn, Ph.D., with co-authors Drs. Leahy and Holland, published a new edition of their book "Treatment Plans and Interventions for Depression and Anxiety Disorders." The book details indispensable tools for treating the most common clinical problems encountered in outpatient mental health practice. Chapters provide basic information on depression and the six major anxiety disorders; step-by-step instructions for evidence-based assessment and intervention; illustrative case examples; and practical guidance for writing reports and dealing with third-party payers. In a convenient large-size format, the book features 125 reproducible client handouts, homework sheets, and therapist forms for assessment and record keeping. The included CD-ROM enables clinicians to rapidly generate individualized treatment plans, print extra copies of the forms, and find information on frequently prescribed medications. New to this edition includes the latest research on each disorder and its treatment; innovative techniques that draw on cognitive, behavior, and mindfulness- and acceptance-based approaches; two chapters offering expanded descriptions of basic behavioral and cognitive techniques.

     
     
  • Upcoming Conference

    American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) 60 Annual Meeting: Orlando, Florida (October 22-27, 2013)

  • Alumni News

    Alumni, you are still part of the Ferkauf family. Keep on top of what our alumni have been up to, and also check out the Ferkauf Alumni site for the latest alumni news, including benefits available to you.

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